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Article

Fasting Interventions for Stress, Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille, Aix-Marseille University, Faculté de Médecine—Secteur Timone, EA 3279: CEReSS—Centre d’Etude et de Recherche sur les Services de Santé et la Qualité de vie, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13005 Marseille, France
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Fondation Fonda Mental, 94000 Créteil, France
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Institut de Neuro-Épidémiologie Tropicale, Université de Limoges, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13005 Marseille, France
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Roser Granero and Diego Redolar Ripoll
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3947; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113947
Received: 2 October 2021 / Revised: 25 October 2021 / Accepted: 2 November 2021 / Published: 5 November 2021
Background. Fasting interventions have shown effectiveness in alleviating stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms. However, no quantitative analysis has been carried out thus far. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of fasting interventions on stress, anxiety and depression and if these interventions were associated with increased or decreased fatigue/energy. Methods. Overall, 11 studies and 1436 participants were included in the quantitative analyses. Results. After limiting analyses to randomized controlled trials with low risk of bias, we found that fasting groups had lower anxiety (b = −0.508, p = 0.038), depression levels (b= −0.281, p = 0.012) and body mass index compared to controls without increased fatigue. There was no publication bias and no heterogeneity for these results. These interventions were safe, even in patients with type 2 diabetes. Conclusions. These results should be taken with a caveat. These results are preliminary and encouraging and fasting appears to be a safe intervention. Data are not sufficient to recommend one fasting intervention more than the others. No study was carried out in psychiatric populations and further trials should be carried out in these populations that may be good candidates for fasting interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: public health; mental health; fasting; antidepressant; depression; anxiety; schizophrenia; physical health; obesity public health; mental health; fasting; antidepressant; depression; anxiety; schizophrenia; physical health; obesity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Berthelot, E.; Etchecopar-Etchart, D.; Thellier, D.; Lancon, C.; Boyer, L.; Fond, G. Fasting Interventions for Stress, Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3947. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113947

AMA Style

Berthelot E, Etchecopar-Etchart D, Thellier D, Lancon C, Boyer L, Fond G. Fasting Interventions for Stress, Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Nutrients. 2021; 13(11):3947. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113947

Chicago/Turabian Style

Berthelot, Elisa, Damien Etchecopar-Etchart, Dimitri Thellier, Christophe Lancon, Laurent Boyer, and Guillaume Fond. 2021. "Fasting Interventions for Stress, Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis" Nutrients 13, no. 11: 3947. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113947

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