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Article

The Feasibility of the “Omega Kid” Study Protocol: A Double-Blind, Randomised, Placebo-Controlled Trial Investigating the Effect of Omega-3 Supplementation on Self-Regulation in Preschool-Aged Children

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School of Medicine, Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
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School of Psychology, Faculty of the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
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Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
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Early Start, School of Education, Faculty of the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
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Brain & Behaviour Research Institute, School of Psychology, Faculty of the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
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Statistical Consulting Centre, School of Mathematics and Applied Statistics, Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
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College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD 4870, Australia
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Conditions for Lifelong Learning, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Open University of the Netherlands, 6419 Heerlen, The Netherlands
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Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
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School of Medicine, Molecular Horizons, Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 213; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010213
Received: 10 November 2020 / Revised: 6 January 2021 / Accepted: 9 January 2021 / Published: 13 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Supplementation and Human Behaviour)
Self-regulation, the regulation of behaviour in early childhood, impacts children’s success at school and is a predictor of health, wealth, and criminal outcomes in adulthood. Self-regulation may be optimised by dietary supplementation of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFAs). The aim of the “Omega Kid” study is to investigate the feasibility of a protocol to investigate whether n-3 LCPUFA supplementation enhances self-regulation in preschool-aged children. The protocol assessed involved a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial of 12 weeks duration, with an intervention of 1.6 g of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) per day (0.3 g EPA and 1.3 g DHA) in a microencapsulated powder compared to placebo. Children (n = 78; 40 boys and 38 girls) aged 3–5 years old were recruited and randomly allocated to the treatment (n = 39) or placebo group (n = 39). The HS–Omega-3 Index® served as a manipulation check on the delivery of either active (n-3 LCPUFAs) or placebo powders. Fifty-eight children (76%) completed the intervention (28–30 per group). Compliance to the study protocol was high, with 92% of children providing a finger-prick blood sample at baseline and high reported-adherence to the study intervention (88%). Results indicate that the protocol is feasible and may be employed in an adequately powered clinical trial to test the hypothesis that n-3 LCPUFA supplementation will improve the self-regulation of preschool-aged children. View Full-Text
Keywords: n-3 LCPUFAs; self-regulation; preschool-aged children; feasibility; executive function n-3 LCPUFAs; self-regulation; preschool-aged children; feasibility; executive function
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MDPI and ACS Style

Roach, L.A.; Byrne, M.K.; Howard, S.J.; Johnstone, S.J.; Batterham, M.; Wright, I.M.R.; Okely, A.D.; de Groot, R.H.M.; van der Wurff, I.S.M.; Jones, A.; Meyer, B.J. The Feasibility of the “Omega Kid” Study Protocol: A Double-Blind, Randomised, Placebo-Controlled Trial Investigating the Effect of Omega-3 Supplementation on Self-Regulation in Preschool-Aged Children. Nutrients 2021, 13, 213. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010213

AMA Style

Roach LA, Byrne MK, Howard SJ, Johnstone SJ, Batterham M, Wright IMR, Okely AD, de Groot RHM, van der Wurff ISM, Jones A, Meyer BJ. The Feasibility of the “Omega Kid” Study Protocol: A Double-Blind, Randomised, Placebo-Controlled Trial Investigating the Effect of Omega-3 Supplementation on Self-Regulation in Preschool-Aged Children. Nutrients. 2021; 13(1):213. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010213

Chicago/Turabian Style

Roach, Lauren A., Mitchell K. Byrne, Steven J. Howard, Stuart J. Johnstone, Marijka Batterham, Ian M. R. Wright, Anthony D. Okely, Renate H. M. de Groot, Inge S. M. van der Wurff, Alison Jones, and Barbara J. Meyer. 2021. "The Feasibility of the “Omega Kid” Study Protocol: A Double-Blind, Randomised, Placebo-Controlled Trial Investigating the Effect of Omega-3 Supplementation on Self-Regulation in Preschool-Aged Children" Nutrients 13, no. 1: 213. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010213

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