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Article

Physicochemical Properties and Effects of Honeys on Key Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Cholesterol Homeostasis in HepG2 Cells

1
The Pangenomics Lab, School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
2
Vietnam Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Post-Harvest Technology, Hanoi 10000, Vietnam
3
The UWA Institute of Agriculture, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6001, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2021, 13(1), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010151
Received: 22 October 2020 / Revised: 3 December 2020 / Accepted: 18 December 2020 / Published: 5 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Bee Products)
Manuka honey and newly developed honeys (arjuna, guggul, jiaogulan and olive) were examined for their physicochemical, biochemical properties and effects on oxidative stress and cholesterol homeostasis in fatty acid-induced HepG2 cells. The honeys exhibited standard moisture content (<20%), electrical conductivity (<0.8 mS/cm), acidic pH, and monosaccharides (>60%), except olive honey (<60% total monosaccharides). They all expressed non-Newtonian behavior and 05 typical regions of the FTIR spectra as those of natural ones. Guggul and arjuna, manuka honeys showed the highest phenolic contents, correlating with their significant antioxidant activities. Arjuna, guggul and manuka honeys demonstrated the agreement of total cholesterol reduction and the transcriptional levels of AMPK, SREBP2, HCMGR, LDLR, LXRα. Jiaogulan honey showed the least antioxidant content and activity, but it was the most cytotoxic. Both jiaogulan and olive honeys modulated the tested gene in the pattern that should lead to a lower TC content, but this reduction did not occur after 24 h. All 2% concentrations of tested honeys elicited a clearer effect on NQO1 gene expression. In conclusion, the new honeys complied with international norms for natural honeys and we provide partial evidence for the protective effects of manuka, arjuna and guggul honeys amongst the tested ones on key biomarkers of oxidative stress and cholesterol homeostasis, pending further studies to better understand their modes of action. View Full-Text
Keywords: honey; phytochemicals; antioxidants; cholesterol; oxidative stress; gene expression honey; phytochemicals; antioxidants; cholesterol; oxidative stress; gene expression
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nguyen, H.T.L.; Kasapis, S.; Mantri, N. Physicochemical Properties and Effects of Honeys on Key Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Cholesterol Homeostasis in HepG2 Cells. Nutrients 2021, 13, 151. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010151

AMA Style

Nguyen HTL, Kasapis S, Mantri N. Physicochemical Properties and Effects of Honeys on Key Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Cholesterol Homeostasis in HepG2 Cells. Nutrients. 2021; 13(1):151. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010151

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nguyen, Huong Thi Lan, Stefan Kasapis, and Nitin Mantri. 2021. "Physicochemical Properties and Effects of Honeys on Key Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Cholesterol Homeostasis in HepG2 Cells" Nutrients 13, no. 1: 151. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13010151

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