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Open AccessArticle

Breastfeeding and Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Perimenopausal Women

1
Institute of Health Sciences, The Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, ul. Zeromskiego 5, 25-369 Kielce, Poland
2
Institute of Biology, The Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, ul. Zeromskiego 5, 25-369 Kielce, Poland
3
Institute of Medical Sciences, The Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, ul. Zeromskiego 5, 25-369 Kielce, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2691; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092691
Received: 9 July 2020 / Revised: 1 September 2020 / Accepted: 1 September 2020 / Published: 3 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Diet in Metabolic Syndrome)
Little is known about the long-term benefits of breastfeeding for mother’s metabolic health. This study aimed to investigate the links between breastfeeding duration and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in perimenopausal women. The analysis included a group of 7621 women aged 55.4 ± 5.4 years. MetS and its components were defined according to the International Diabetes Federation guidelines. Women who breastfed for 13–18 months and beyond 18 months were at lower risk of MetS (odds ratio OR) = 0.76, 95% CI 0.60–0.95; p = 0.017 and OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.64–0.98; p = 0.030, respectively) than those who never breastfed. Meanwhile, women who breastfed for 7–12 months showed increased glucose concentration (OR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.63–0.94; p = 0.012) compared with those who had never breastfed. The additional analysis involving parity showed that women who had given birth to two babies and breastfed them had lower odds of MetS than those who never breastfed (p < 0.05), although there was no significant difference among women who breastfed for >18 months. Women who had given birth to at least three children and breastfed for 1–6 and 13–18 months had lower odds of MetS and increased triglyceride concentration (p < 0.05). Moreover, participants having breastfed for 1–6 months were found to have a reduced risk of abdominal obesity compared with those who had not breastfed (p < 0.05). Breastfeeding is associated with lower prevalence of MetS in perimenopausal women and can be recommended as a way of reducing the risk of MetS and its components. View Full-Text
Keywords: lactation; parity; metabolic health lactation; parity; metabolic health
MDPI and ACS Style

Suliga, E.; Ciesla, E.; Gluszek-Osuch, M.; Lysek-Gladysinska, M.; Wawrzycka, I.; Gluszek, S. Breastfeeding and Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome among Perimenopausal Women. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2691.

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