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Article

A Nursery-Based Cooking Skills Programme with Parents and Children Reduced Food Fussiness and Increased Willingness to Try Vegetables: A Quasi-Experimental Study

1
Human Nutrition, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK
2
Lanarkshire Community Food and Health Partnership, Bargeddie G69 7TU, UK
3
Academic Achievement Team, Library Services, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UX, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2623; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092623
Received: 30 July 2020 / Revised: 20 August 2020 / Accepted: 26 August 2020 / Published: 28 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy Diet and Lifestyles in the Pediatric Population)
Children’s fussy eating is associated with a reduced vegetable intake. This quasi-experimental study evaluated “Big Chef Little Chef” (BCLC), a nursery-based cooking skills programme aimed at reducing food fussiness and increasing willingness to try green vegetables by incorporating repeated exposure and sensory learning. Parent and child (3–5 years) dyads attended BCLC for four/1.5 h weekly sessions. A comparison group was recruited after BCLC completion and attended a single education session at week 1. A questionnaire measured food fussiness at week 1 and week 4. At week 4, all children were offered six green vegetables (raw and cooked) and an average score (1 = did not try; 2 = tried it/ate some; 3 = ate it all) was calculated for willingness to try vegetables. In total, 121 dyads (intervention: n = 64; comparison: n = 57) participated. The food fussiness score (1 min–5 max) in the intervention group decreased significantly from 3.0 to 2.6 (p < 0.01) between time points, while there was no change in the comparison group (3.1 (week 1) and 3.0 (week 4)). The intervention group was more willing to try green vegetables with significantly higher (p < 0.001) median scores for raw and cooked vegetables (2.5 for both) compared with the comparison group (2.0 and 1.7, respectively). The BCLC reduced food fussiness and increased willingness to try green vegetables. View Full-Text
Keywords: preschool child; vegetables; eating behaviour; cooking skills; parent; repeated exposure; sensory learning preschool child; vegetables; eating behaviour; cooking skills; parent; repeated exposure; sensory learning
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MDPI and ACS Style

Garcia, A.L.; Brown, E.; Goodale, T.; McLachlan, M.; Parrett, A. A Nursery-Based Cooking Skills Programme with Parents and Children Reduced Food Fussiness and Increased Willingness to Try Vegetables: A Quasi-Experimental Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2623. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092623

AMA Style

Garcia AL, Brown E, Goodale T, McLachlan M, Parrett A. A Nursery-Based Cooking Skills Programme with Parents and Children Reduced Food Fussiness and Increased Willingness to Try Vegetables: A Quasi-Experimental Study. Nutrients. 2020; 12(9):2623. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092623

Chicago/Turabian Style

Garcia, Ada L., Emma Brown, Tom Goodale, Mairi McLachlan, and Alison Parrett. 2020. "A Nursery-Based Cooking Skills Programme with Parents and Children Reduced Food Fussiness and Increased Willingness to Try Vegetables: A Quasi-Experimental Study" Nutrients 12, no. 9: 2623. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092623

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