Next Article in Journal
Select Polyphenol-Rich Berry Consumption to Defer or Deter Diabetes and Diabetes-Related Complications
Next Article in Special Issue
Impact of Infant and Maternal Factors on Energy and Macronutrient Composition of Human Milk
Previous Article in Journal
Clustering of Dietary Patterns and Lifestyles Among Spanish Children in the EsNuPI Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Synbiotic Effect of Bifidobacterium lactis CNCM I-3446 and Bovine Milk-Derived Oligosaccharides on Infant Gut Microbiota
Open AccessArticle

Effect of Maternal Diet and Milk Lipid Composition on the Infant Gut and Maternal Milk Microbiomes

1
The Shmunis School of Biomedicine and Cancer Research, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6900001, Israel
2
Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion- Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003, Israel
3
School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69000, Israel
4
Safra Children’s Hospital, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan 52621, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2539; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092539
Received: 15 July 2020 / Revised: 17 August 2020 / Accepted: 18 August 2020 / Published: 21 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Milk, HMO, Lactation and Application in Infant Feeding)
Inter-subject variability in human milk microbiome is well known; however, its origins and possible relationship to the mother’s diet are still debated. We investigated associations between maternal nutrition, milk fatty acids composition and microbiomes in mother–infant dyads. Breast milk and infant fecal samples were collected across three time points (one week, one month and three months postpartum) from 22 mother–infant pairs. Food frequency questionnaires for the months of pregnancy and three months postpartum were collected. Milk fatty acids were analyzed by GC–MS and the microbiome in breast milk and infant feces was determined by 16S rRNA sequencing. Statistical interactions were computed using Spearman’s method and corrected for multiple comparisons. We found significant negative correlation between Streptococcus relative abundance in maternal milk and intake of unsaturated fatty acids and folic acid at one month postpartum. At three months postpartum, vitamin B-12 consumption was significantly associated with a single operational taxonomic unit belonging to Streptococcus. Comparison between milk microbiome and lipid composition showed, one-month postpartum, significant negative correlation between Streptococcus relative abundance and the abundance of oleic acid. Additional correlations were detected between Staphylococcus hominis and two medium-chain saturated fatty acids. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that maternal nutrition may affect milk microbiome. View Full-Text
Keywords: breast milk; human milk microbiome; human milk fat composition; infant gut microbiome; maternal diet breast milk; human milk microbiome; human milk fat composition; infant gut microbiome; maternal diet
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Babakobi, M.D.; Reshef, L.; Gihaz, S.; Belgorodsky, B.; Fishman, A.; Bujanover, Y.; Gophna, U. Effect of Maternal Diet and Milk Lipid Composition on the Infant Gut and Maternal Milk Microbiomes. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2539.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop