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Open AccessArticle

Flour for Home Baking: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Supermarket Products Emphasising the Whole Grain Opportunity

1
Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council, Mount Street, North Sydney, NSW 2060, Australia
2
School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 2058; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072058
Received: 22 May 2020 / Revised: 8 July 2020 / Accepted: 9 July 2020 / Published: 10 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Whole Grains for Nutrition and Health Benefits)
Flour, typically derived from wheat, rye, corn and rice is a pantry staple, providing structure to bread and baked goods. This study aimed to provide a cross-sectional analysis of flour for home baking, highlighting the nutrition composition of whole grain flour and identifying novel categories. An audit was undertaken in February 2020, in four major supermarkets in metropolitan Sydney (Aldi, Coles, IGA and Woolworths). Ingredient lists, Nutrition Information Panel, claims, and country of origin were collected. The median and range were calculated for energy, protein, fat, saturated fat, carbohydrate, sugars, dietary fibre and sodium. Overall, 130 products were collected, including 26 plain flour, 12 self-raising, 17 plain wholemeal, 4 wholemeal self-raising, 20 bread-making mixes (4 were whole grain), 20 other refined grain (including corn and rice flour), 17 gluten-free, 3 legume, 4 fruit/vegetable, 4 coconut and 3 other non-grain (e.g., hemp seed, cricket flour) products. Plain wheat flour dominated the category, while whole grain (wholemeal) made up 19% of products, yet they contained significantly more dietary fibre (p < 0.001) and protein (p < 0.001). Self-raising flours were significantly higher in sodium (p < 0.001) and gluten-free products were lower in protein and dietary fibre, making legume, buckwheat and quinoa flour a better choice. Sustainability principles in fruit and vegetable production and novel insect products have driven new product development. There is a clear opportunity for further on-pack promotion of whole grain and dietary fibre within the category via food product labelling. View Full-Text
Keywords: whole grain; dietary fibre; sodium; sustainability; gluten free whole grain; dietary fibre; sodium; sustainability; gluten free
MDPI and ACS Style

Hughes, J.; Vaiciurgis, V.; Grafenauer, S. Flour for Home Baking: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Supermarket Products Emphasising the Whole Grain Opportunity. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2058. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072058

AMA Style

Hughes J, Vaiciurgis V, Grafenauer S. Flour for Home Baking: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Supermarket Products Emphasising the Whole Grain Opportunity. Nutrients. 2020; 12(7):2058. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072058

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hughes, Jaimee; Vaiciurgis, Verena; Grafenauer, Sara. 2020. "Flour for Home Baking: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Supermarket Products Emphasising the Whole Grain Opportunity" Nutrients 12, no. 7: 2058. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072058

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