Next Article in Journal
Ultra-Processed Foods and Health Outcomes: A Narrative Review
Next Article in Special Issue
The Effectiveness of Synbiotic Preparation Containing Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium Probiotic Strains and Short Chain Fructooligosaccharides in Patients with Diarrhea Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome—A Randomized Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study
Previous Article in Journal
Food Addiction Mediates the Relationship between Perceived Stress and Body Mass Index in Taiwan Young Adults
Previous Article in Special Issue
Changes in the Intestinal Microbiome during a Multispecies Probiotic Intervention in Compensated Cirrhosis
Open AccessArticle

Effects of Dietary Fibres on Acute Indomethacin-Induced Intestinal Hyperpermeability in the Elderly: A Randomised Placebo Controlled Parallel Clinical Trial

1
School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Södra Grev Rosengatan 32, 703 62 Örebro, Sweden
2
Genetic Analysis AS, Kabelgata 8, 0580 Oslo, Norway
3
Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 1954; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071954 (registering DOI)
Received: 25 May 2020 / Revised: 18 June 2020 / Accepted: 28 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Prebiotics and Probiotics in Health and Disease)
The effect of dietary fibres on intestinal barrier function has not been well studied, especially in the elderly. We aimed to investigate the potential of the dietary fibres oat β-glucan and wheat arabinoxylan to strengthen the intestinal barrier function and counteract acute non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (indomethacin)-induced hyperpermeability in the elderly. A general population of elderly subjects (≥65 years, n = 49) was randomised to a daily supplementation (12g/day) of oat β-glucan, arabinoxylan or placebo (maltodextrin) for six weeks. The primary outcome was change in acute indomethacin-induced intestinal permeability from baseline, assessed by an in vivo multi-sugar permeability test. Secondary outcomes were changes from baseline in: gut microbiota composition, systemic inflammatory status and self-reported health. Despite a majority of the study population (85%) showing a habitual fibre intake below the recommendation, no significant effects on acute indomethacin-induced intestinal hyperpermeability in vivo or gut microbiota composition were observed after six weeks intervention with either dietary fibre, compared to placebo. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary fibres; prebiotics; intestinal permeability; NSAIDs; clinical trial; elderly; intestinal barrier function; gut health dietary fibres; prebiotics; intestinal permeability; NSAIDs; clinical trial; elderly; intestinal barrier function; gut health
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Ganda Mall, J.-P.; Fart, F.; Sabet, J.A.; Lindqvist, C.M.; Nestestog, R.; Hegge, F.T.; Keita, Å.V.; Brummer, R.J.; Schoultz, I. Effects of Dietary Fibres on Acute Indomethacin-Induced Intestinal Hyperpermeability in the Elderly: A Randomised Placebo Controlled Parallel Clinical Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1954.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop