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Open AccessArticle

Food Sources and Expenditures for Seafood in the United States

1
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA
2
Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
3
Institute for Sustainable Food Systems and School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
4
Department of Industrial Economics, University of Stavanger, 4021 Stavanger, Norway
5
Department of Health Sciences, William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185, USA
6
Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
7
Center for Human Nutrition, Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1810; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061810
Received: 19 May 2020 / Revised: 12 June 2020 / Accepted: 15 June 2020 / Published: 17 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Value of Seafood)
The aim of this study was to explore United States (U.S.) seafood consumption patterns, food sourcing, expenditures, and geography of consumption. We analyzed seafood intake and food sourcing using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2007–2008 to 2015–2016 for US adults ≥19 years old (n = 26,743 total respondents; n = 4957 respondents consumed seafood in the past 24 h). Seafood expenditures were extrapolated by combining NHANES with three other public datasets. U.S. adults consumed 63% of seafood (by weight) at home. The top sources of seafood (by weight) were food retail (56%), restaurants (31%), and caught by the respondent or someone they know (5%). Sixty-five percent of consumer expenditures for seafood were at restaurants and other “away from home” sources while 35% were at retail and other “at home” sources. Slightly less than half of overall U.S. food expenditures are “away from home,” which is much lower than for seafood, suggesting that consumers have very different spending habits for seafood than for an aggregate of all foods. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; fish; salmon; shrimp; restaurant; food away from home; food at home; NHANES; retail; seafood diet; fish; salmon; shrimp; restaurant; food away from home; food at home; NHANES; retail; seafood
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MDPI and ACS Style

Love, D.C.; Asche, F.; Conrad, Z.; Young, R.; Harding, J.; Nussbaumer, E.M.; Thorne-Lyman, A.L.; Neff, R. Food Sources and Expenditures for Seafood in the United States. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1810. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061810

AMA Style

Love DC, Asche F, Conrad Z, Young R, Harding J, Nussbaumer EM, Thorne-Lyman AL, Neff R. Food Sources and Expenditures for Seafood in the United States. Nutrients. 2020; 12(6):1810. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061810

Chicago/Turabian Style

Love, David C.; Asche, Frank; Conrad, Zach; Young, Ruth; Harding, Jamie; Nussbaumer, Elizabeth M.; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L.; Neff, Roni. 2020. "Food Sources and Expenditures for Seafood in the United States" Nutrients 12, no. 6: 1810. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061810

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