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Open AccessArticle

Intestinal Permeability in Children with Celiac Disease after the Administration of Oligofructose-Enriched Inulin into a Gluten-Free Diet—Results of a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Pilot Trial

1
Department of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences, 10-748 Olsztyn, Poland
2
Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology, and Nutrition, Collegium Medicum, University of Warmia & Mazury, 10-719 Olsztyn, Poland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1736; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061736
Received: 21 May 2020 / Revised: 2 June 2020 / Accepted: 9 June 2020 / Published: 10 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Prebiotics and Probiotics in Health and Disease)
Abnormalities in the intestinal barrier are a possible cause of celiac disease (CD) development. In animal studies, the positive effect of prebiotics on the improvement of gut barrier parameters has been observed, but the results of human studies to date remain inconsistent. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of twelve-week supplementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) with prebiotic oligofructose-enriched inulin (10 g per day) on the intestinal permeability in children with CD treated with a GFD. A pilot, randomized, placebo-controlled nutritional intervention was conducted in 34 children with CD, being on a strict GFD. Sugar absorption test (SAT) and the concentrations of intestinal permeability markers, such as zonulin, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, claudin-3, calprotectin, and glucagon-like peptide-2, were measured. We found that the supplementation with prebiotic did not have a substantial effect on barrier integrity. Prebiotic intake increased excretion of mannitol, which may suggest an increase in the epithelial surface. Most children in our study seem to have normal values for intestinal permeability tests before the intervention. For individuals with elevated values, improvement in calprotectin and SAT was observed after the prebiotic intake. This preliminary study suggests that prebiotics may have an impact on the intestinal barrier, but it requires confirmation in studies with more subjects with ongoing leaky gut. View Full-Text
Keywords: intestinal permeability; leaky gut; gut barrier; celiac disease; prebiotic; gluten-free diet; randomized controlled trial; gluten immunogenic peptides; sugar absorption test intestinal permeability; leaky gut; gut barrier; celiac disease; prebiotic; gluten-free diet; randomized controlled trial; gluten immunogenic peptides; sugar absorption test
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Drabińska, N.; Krupa-Kozak, U.; Jarocka-Cyrta, E. Intestinal Permeability in Children with Celiac Disease after the Administration of Oligofructose-Enriched Inulin into a Gluten-Free Diet—Results of a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Pilot Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1736.

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