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How Important Is Eating Rate in the Physiological Response to Food Intake, Control of Body Weight, and Glycemia?

1
Diabetes Unit, Athens Medical Center, 151 25 Marousi, Greece
2
First Department of Propaedeutic Internal Medicine, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Laiko Hospital, 115 27 Athens, Greece
3
Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 115 27 Athens, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1734; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061734
Received: 8 May 2020 / Revised: 1 June 2020 / Accepted: 5 June 2020 / Published: 10 June 2020
The link between eating rate and energy intake has long been a matter of extensive research. A better understanding of the effect of food intake speed on body weight and glycemia in the long term could serve as a means to prevent weight gain and/or dysglycemia. Whether a fast eating rate plays an important role in increased energy intake and body weight depends on various factors related to the studied food such as texture, viscosity and taste, but seems to be also influenced by the habitual characteristics of the studied subjects as well. Hunger and satiety quantified via test meals in acute experiments with subsequent energy intake measurements and their association with anorexigenic and orexigenic regulating peptides provide further insight to the complicated pathogenesis of obesity. The present review examines data from the abundant literature on the subject of eating rate, and highlights the main findings in people with normal weight, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, with the aim of clarifying the association between rate of food intake and hunger, satiety, glycemia, and energy intake in the short and long term. View Full-Text
Keywords: eating rate; body weight; glycemia; energy intake; hunger; satiety eating rate; body weight; glycemia; energy intake; hunger; satiety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Argyrakopoulou, G.; Simati, S.; Dimitriadis, G.; Kokkinos, A. How Important Is Eating Rate in the Physiological Response to Food Intake, Control of Body Weight, and Glycemia? Nutrients 2020, 12, 1734. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061734

AMA Style

Argyrakopoulou G, Simati S, Dimitriadis G, Kokkinos A. How Important Is Eating Rate in the Physiological Response to Food Intake, Control of Body Weight, and Glycemia? Nutrients. 2020; 12(6):1734. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061734

Chicago/Turabian Style

Argyrakopoulou, Georgia, Stamatia Simati, George Dimitriadis, and Alexander Kokkinos. 2020. "How Important Is Eating Rate in the Physiological Response to Food Intake, Control of Body Weight, and Glycemia?" Nutrients 12, no. 6: 1734. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061734

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