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Review

Lutein Supplementation for Eye Diseases

1
Department of Ophthalmology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
2
School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
3
Department of Ophthalmology, Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
4
Manton Center for Orphan Disease, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1721; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061721
Received: 22 April 2020 / Revised: 3 June 2020 / Accepted: 5 June 2020 / Published: 9 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Support for Eye and Vision Health)
Lutein is one of the few xanthophyll carotenoids that is found in high concentration in the macula of human retina. As de novo synthesis of lutein within the human body is impossible, lutein can only be obtained from diet. It is a natural substance abundant in egg yolk and dark green leafy vegetables. Many basic and clinical studies have reported lutein’s anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties in the eye, suggesting its beneficial effects on protection and alleviation of ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, myopia, and cataract. Most importantly, lutein is categorized as Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS), posing minimal side-effects upon long term consumption. In this review, we will discuss the chemical structure and properties of lutein as well as its application and safety as a nutritional supplement. Finally, the effects of lutein consumption on the aforementioned eye diseases will be reviewed. View Full-Text
Keywords: age-related macular degeneration; antioxidant; carotenoid; diabetic retinopathy; myopia; cataract; nutrition; retina; retinopathy of prematurity; xanthophyll age-related macular degeneration; antioxidant; carotenoid; diabetic retinopathy; myopia; cataract; nutrition; retina; retinopathy of prematurity; xanthophyll
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, L.H.; Lee, J.C.-Y.; Leung, H.H.; Lam, W.C.; Fu, Z.; Lo, A.C.Y. Lutein Supplementation for Eye Diseases. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1721. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061721

AMA Style

Li LH, Lee JC-Y, Leung HH, Lam WC, Fu Z, Lo ACY. Lutein Supplementation for Eye Diseases. Nutrients. 2020; 12(6):1721. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061721

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Long H., Jetty C.-Y. Lee, Ho H. Leung, Wai C. Lam, Zhongjie Fu, and Amy C.Y. Lo 2020. "Lutein Supplementation for Eye Diseases" Nutrients 12, no. 6: 1721. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061721

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