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Open AccessReview

Diet Supplementation, Probiotics, and Nutraceuticals in SARS-CoV-2 Infection: A Scoping Review

1
Department of Clinical Internal, Anesthesiologic and Cardiovascular Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
2
Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza, University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
3
Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, 04100 Latina, Italy
4
Mediterranea Cardiocentro, 80133 Naples, Italy
5
Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, Azienda Ospedaliera San Giovanni Addolorata, 00184 Rome, Italy
6
Department of General Surgery and Surgical Specialities “Paride Stefanini”, Sapienza, University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy
7
IRCCS NeuroMed, 86077 Pozzilli (IS), Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1718; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061718
Received: 30 April 2020 / Revised: 29 May 2020 / Accepted: 5 June 2020 / Published: 8 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders)
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (Sars-CoV-2) global pandemic is a devastating event that is causing thousands of victims every day around the world. One of the main reasons of the great impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on society is its unexpected spread, which has not allowed an adequate preparation. The scientific community is fighting against time for the production of a vaccine, but it is difficult to place a safe and effective product on the market as fast as the virus is spreading. Similarly, for drugs that can directly interfere with viral pathways, their production times are long, despite the great efforts made. For these reasons, we analyzed the possible role of non-pharmacological substances such as supplements, probiotics, and nutraceuticals in reducing the risk of Sars-CoV-2 infection or mitigating the symptoms of COVID-19. These substances could have numerous advantages in the current circumstances, are generally easily available, and have negligible side effects if administered at the already used and tested dosages. Large scientific evidence supports the benefits that some bacterial and molecular products may exert on the immune response to respiratory viruses. These could also have a regulatory role in systemic inflammation or endothelial damage, which are two crucial aspects of COVID-19. However, there are no specific data available, and rigorous clinical trials should be conducted to confirm the putative benefits of diet supplementation, probiotics, and nutraceuticals in the current pandemic. View Full-Text
Keywords: supplementation; probiotics; nutraceuticals; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19 supplementation; probiotics; nutraceuticals; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19
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MDPI and ACS Style

Infusino, F.; Marazzato, M.; Mancone, M.; Fedele, F.; Mastroianni, C.M.; Severino, P.; Ceccarelli, G.; Santinelli, L.; Cavarretta, E.; Marullo, A.G.M.; Miraldi, F.; Carnevale, R.; Nocella, C.; Biondi-Zoccai, G.; Pagnini, C.; Schiavon, S.; Pugliese, F.; Frati, G.; d’Ettorre, G. Diet Supplementation, Probiotics, and Nutraceuticals in SARS-CoV-2 Infection: A Scoping Review. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1718.

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