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Open AccessArticle

Amount of Protein Required to Improve Muscle Mass in Older Adults

Department of Food and Nutrition, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763, Korea
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Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1700; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061700
Received: 7 May 2020 / Revised: 1 June 2020 / Accepted: 4 June 2020 / Published: 6 June 2020
Increased protein intake has been suggested as an effective strategy to treat age-related loss of muscle mass and function, but the amount of protein required to improve muscle and function without exercise in older adults remains unclear. Thus, this secondary data analysis aimed to assess what amount of protein from habitual protein intake was positively associated with changes in muscle mass and gait speed in older women and men. Ninety-six community-dwelling older adults consumed 0.8, 1.2, or 1.5 g/kg/day of protein and maintained their usual physical activity for 12 weeks. Increased protein intake of >0.54 g/kg/day was positively associated with changes in appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM)/weight (B = 0.591, p = 0.026), ASM/body mass index (B = 0.615, p = 0.023), and ASM:fat ratio (B = 0.509, p = 0.030) in older men. However, change in protein intake was not associated with change in muscle mass in older women. Additionally, change in protein intake was not associated with change in gait speed in older women and men. The present study suggested that an increased absolute protein amount of >0.54 g/kg/day from habitual protein intake was positively associated with change in muscle mass in older men. View Full-Text
Keywords: increased protein amount; muscle mass; sexual dimorphism; older adults increased protein amount; muscle mass; sexual dimorphism; older adults
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Kim, D.; Park, Y. Amount of Protein Required to Improve Muscle Mass in Older Adults. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1700.

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