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Open AccessArticle

Are Vitamin D3 Tablets and Oil Drops Equally Effective in Raising S-25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations? A Post-Hoc Analysis of an Observational Study on Immunodeficient Patients

1
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Blickagången 16, Neo floor 7, SE-141 83 Huddinge, Sweden
2
ASIH Stockholm Södra, Långbro Park, Palliative Home Care and Hospice Ward, Bergtallsvägen 12, SE-125 59 Älvsjö, Sweden
3
Department of Infectious Diseases, The Immunodeficiency Unit, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden
4
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden
5
Stockholms Sjukhem, Palliative Home Care and Hospice Ward, Mariebergsgatan 22, 112 19 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1230; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051230
Received: 22 March 2020 / Revised: 12 April 2020 / Accepted: 21 April 2020 / Published: 26 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamin D on Immune Function)
Background: Vitamin D3 supplements are available as tablets or oil drops, but there is no consensus as to whether either of these preparations is more effective than the other. Methods: We compared the effectiveness of tablets versus oil in raising S-25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25-OHD) in plasma by re-analyzing data from a previously performed observational study in which immunodeficient patients with S-25-OHD concentrations <75 nmol/L were randomly prescribed vitamin D3 tablets (1600 IU/day) or vitamin D3 oil-drops (1500 IU/day) for twelve months. Tablets and oil were compared for the effect on S-25-OHD concentrations after 3–5 months and antibiotic use. Results: Data on S-25-OHD after ≥ 3 months was available for 137 patients treated with tablets and 69 with oil drops. Both groups exhibited a significant increase in S-25-OHD—oil-drops from 55 to 86 nmol/L and tablets from 52 to 87 nmol/L—with no difference between groups (p = 0.77). In a subgroup of patients without immunoglobulin replacement, vitamin D3 supplementation with oil drops (n = 34) but not with tablets (n = 60) resulted in significantly lower antibiotic administration (p < 0.001 and p = 0.58). Conclusion: Vitamin D3 supplementation with tablets and oil drops were equally efficient in raising S-25-OHD concentrations. Only oil drops caused a reduction in antibiotic consumption in immuno-deficient patients who did not receive immunoglobulin replacement. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin D; Detremin (cholecalciferol); Divisun (cholecalciferol); cholecalciferol; supplementation; clinical trial; infections; antibiotics; oil drops; tablets; S-25-OHD vitamin D; Detremin (cholecalciferol); Divisun (cholecalciferol); cholecalciferol; supplementation; clinical trial; infections; antibiotics; oil drops; tablets; S-25-OHD
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Helde Frankling, M.; Norlin, A.-C.; Hansen, S.; Wahren Borgström, E.; Bergman, P.; Björkhem-Bergman, L. Are Vitamin D3 Tablets and Oil Drops Equally Effective in Raising S-25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations? A Post-Hoc Analysis of an Observational Study on Immunodeficient Patients. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1230.

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