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Open AccessArticle

An Approach for Examining the Impact of Food Group-Based Sources of Nutrients on Outcomes with Application to PUFAs and LDL in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

1
Department of Biostatistics and Data Science, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
2
Department of Health Sciences, Furman University, Greenville, SC 29613, USA
3
School of Nursing and Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
4
Department of Rehabilitation, Exercise, and Nutrition Sciences, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0394, USA
5
Departments of Nutrition and Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
6
Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Department of Research & Evaluation, Pasadena, CA 91101, USA
7
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 941; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040941
Received: 20 February 2020 / Revised: 20 March 2020 / Accepted: 25 March 2020 / Published: 28 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Fats and Cardiometabolic Health)
Traditionally, nutritional epidemiologists have utilized single nutrient or dietary pattern approaches to examine diet-health relationships. However, the former ignores that nutrients are consumed from foods within dietary patterns, and, conversely, dietary patterns may provide little information on mechanisms of action. Substitution provides a framework for estimating diet-health relationships while holding some nutrient intakes constant. We examined substitution effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study in the context of food group source. PUFAs were calculated from fatty acids 18:3, 20:5, and 22:6 (n-3), and 18:2 and 20:4 (n-6) from a food frequency questionnaire, quantified by food group. Models were adjusted for other fat intake, carbohydrates, protein, age, race, gender, and diabetes duration. Participants (n = 1441) were 14 years old on average, 51% female, with type 1 diabetes for 3.6 years. Mean intake of PUFAs was 14.9 g/day, and the highest PUFA sources were nonsolid fats, nuts, grains, red/processed meats, sweets/desserts, and high-fat chicken. PUFAs from nuts were inversely associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) (p = 0.03) and PUFAs from high-fat chicken were positively associated with LDL (p < 0.01). Substituting nuts for chicken was associated with −7.4 mg/dL in LDL. These findings illustrate the importance of considering food group-based sources of nutrients when examining diet-health relationships. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary patterns; LDL cholesterol; polyunsaturated fatty acids; food groups dietary patterns; LDL cholesterol; polyunsaturated fatty acids; food groups
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Tooze, J.A.; The, N.S.; Crandell, J.L.; Couch, S.C.; Mayer-Davis, E.J.; Koebnick, C.; Liese, A.D. An Approach for Examining the Impact of Food Group-Based Sources of Nutrients on Outcomes with Application to PUFAs and LDL in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes. Nutrients 2020, 12, 941.

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