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The Use of Dietary Supplements Among African and Caribbean Women Living in the UK: A Cross-Sectional Study

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School of Human Sciences, Faculty of Education, Health and Human Sciences, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Campus, London SE10 9LS, UK
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School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Education, Health and Human Sciences, University of Greenwich, Avery Hill Campus, Avery Hill Road, London SE9 2UG, UK
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School of Life Sciences, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, University of Westminster, Cavendish Campus, 115 New Cavendish Street, London W1W 6UW, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 847; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030847
Received: 28 February 2020 / Revised: 16 March 2020 / Accepted: 18 March 2020 / Published: 22 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Previous studies have shown that the use of dietary supplements is associated with the prevention of birth defects, negative pregnancy outcomes and cardiovascular diseases. However, there might be some ethnic disparities in supplement usage suggesting that women who could benefit from it are not frequent users. This study aimed to characterise the use of dietary supplement among Black African and Black Caribbean women living in the United Kingdom (UK). Furthermore, it evaluated possible associations between the use of dietary supplements and health and diet awareness. A total of 262 women self-ascribed as Black African and Black Caribbean living in the UK completed a comprehensive questionnaire on socio-demographic factors, diet, use of supplements and cultural factors. The main outcome variable was the regular use of any type of dietary supplement. Use of vitamin D and/or calcium was also explored. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was applied to identify predictors of regular use of dietary supplements. A total of 33.2% of women reported regular use of any dietary supplements and 16.8% reported use of vitamin D and/or calcium. There were no significant ethnic differences in the use of dietary supplements. Reporting use of the back of food packaging label (odds ratio (OR) 2.21; 95% CI 1.07–4.55); a self-rated healthy diet (OR 2.86; 95% CI 1.19–6.91) and having cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension and/or high cholesterol (OR 3.81; 95% CI 1.53–9.49) increased the likelihood of using any dietary supplement. However, having poorer awareness decreased the likelihood (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.88–0.99) of using any dietary supplement. For the use of vitamin D and/or calcium supplements, the main predictor was having CVD, hypertension and/or high cholesterol (OR 4.43; 95% CI 1.90–10.35). The prevalence of dietary supplement use was low among African and Caribbean women. Thus, awareness of potential benefits of some dietary supplements (e.g., vitamin D) among the Black population should be promoted. View Full-Text
Keywords: African; Caribbean; ethnic minority; dietary supplement; vitamin D; women African; Caribbean; ethnic minority; dietary supplement; vitamin D; women
MDPI and ACS Style

Adegboye, A.R.A.; Ojo, O.; Begum, G. The Use of Dietary Supplements Among African and Caribbean Women Living in the UK: A Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 847.

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