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Open AccessArticle

Effect of the Lactococcus Lactis 11/19-B1 Strain on Atopic Dermatitis in a Clinical Test and Mouse Model

1
Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan
2
Laboratory Animal Research Center, School of Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan
3
Department of Basic Pathology, School of Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan
4
Isome Children’s Clinic, Fukushima 960-8165, Japan
5
Department of Pediatrics, Ohara General Hospital, Fukushima 960-8611, Japan
6
Department of Pediatrics, Fujita General Hospital, Kunimi, Date, Fukushima 969-1793, Japan
7
Ichikawa Clinic, Fukushima 960-0112, Japan
8
Tohoku Kyodo Milk Co., Ltd., Motomiya, Fukushima 969-1104, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 763; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030763
Received: 4 February 2020 / Revised: 11 March 2020 / Accepted: 12 March 2020 / Published: 14 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Prebiotics and Probiotics)
Some lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known to improve atopic dermatitis (AD) through the regulation and stimulation of the host immune system. In this study, we found that ingestion of yogurt containing Lactococcus lactis 11/19-B1 strain (L. lactis 11/19-B1) daily for 8 weeks significantly improved the severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) system score from 38.8 ± 14.4 to 24.2 ± 12.0 in children suffering from AD. We tried to identify which LAB species among the five species contained in the test yogurt contributed to the improvement in AD pathology using an AD mouse model induced by repeated application of 1-fluoro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB). AD-like skin lesions on the dorsal skin and ear were most improved by L. lactis 11/19-B1 intake among the five LAB species. In addition, analysis of CD4+ T cell subsets in Peyer’s patches (PPs) and cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) indicated that the intake of L. lactis 11/19-B1 generally suppressed all subsets related to inflammation, i.e., Th1, Th2 and Th17, instead of activating the suppressive system, Treg, in the AD mouse model. Histological observations showed ingestion of L. lactis 11/19-B1 significantly suppressed severe inflammatory findings, such as inflammatory cell filtration, epidermal erosion and eosinophil infiltration. These results suggest that the immunomodulatory effects of L. lactis 11/19-B1 contribute to improvements in AD pathology. View Full-Text
Keywords: atopic dermatitis; Lactococcus lactis; clinical test; mouse model; t cell subsets atopic dermatitis; Lactococcus lactis; clinical test; mouse model; t cell subsets
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Suzuki, T.; Nishiyama, K.; Kawata, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Isome, M.; Suzuki, S.; Nozawa, R.; Ichikawa, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Suzutani, T. Effect of the Lactococcus Lactis 11/19-B1 Strain on Atopic Dermatitis in a Clinical Test and Mouse Model. Nutrients 2020, 12, 763.

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