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Article

Effect of Exercise Duration on Postprandial Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Responses in Adolescents

Sport Health and Performance Enhancement (SHAPE), Sport Science Department, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham NG11 8NS, UK
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Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 754; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030754
Received: 24 February 2020 / Revised: 9 March 2020 / Accepted: 10 March 2020 / Published: 12 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolic Adaptations to Diet and Physical Activity)
High-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) is a potential intervention to manage hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance in adolescents. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum duration of HIIE to reduce postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses in adolescents and the longevity of the response. Thirty-nine participants (12.4 ± 0.4 year) completed a 30- and 60-min exercise trial (Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test) and a rested control trial in a randomised crossover design. Capillary blood samples were taken at baseline, immediately and 1-h post-exercise; and 30, 60 and 120 min following a standardised lunch (day one) and a standardised breakfast 24-h post-exercise. Plasma insulin total area under the curve (tAUC) following lunch was lower following 60-min HIIE (21,754 ± 16,861 pmol·L−1 × 120 min, p = 0.032) and tended to be lower following 30-min HIIE (24,273 ± 16,131 pmol·L−1 × 120 min, p = 0.080), when compared with the resting condition (26,931 ± 21,634 pmol·L−1 × 120 min). Blood glucose concentration was lower 1-h post-exercise following 30-min HIIE (3.6 ± 0.6 mmol·L−1) when compared to resting (4.1 ± 0.9 mmol·L−1, p = 0.001). Blood glucose and plasma insulin concentration did not differ across trials on day two. Shorter bouts of HIIE (30-min), as well as a 60-min bout, reduced the postprandial insulinaemic response to lunch, an ecologically valid marker of insulin sensitivity. As the beneficial effects of HIIE were limited to 3 h post-exercise, adolescents are recommended to engage daily HIIE to enhance metabolic health. View Full-Text
Keywords: high-intensity intermittent exercise; postprandial; glycaemic; insulinaemic; adolescents; duration; frequency high-intensity intermittent exercise; postprandial; glycaemic; insulinaemic; adolescents; duration; frequency
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dring, K.J.; Cooper, S.B.; Williams, R.A.; Morris, J.G.; Sunderland, C.; Nevill, M.E. Effect of Exercise Duration on Postprandial Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Responses in Adolescents. Nutrients 2020, 12, 754. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030754

AMA Style

Dring KJ, Cooper SB, Williams RA, Morris JG, Sunderland C, Nevill ME. Effect of Exercise Duration on Postprandial Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Responses in Adolescents. Nutrients. 2020; 12(3):754. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030754

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dring, Karah J., Simon B. Cooper, Ryan A. Williams, John G. Morris, Caroline Sunderland, and Mary E. Nevill 2020. "Effect of Exercise Duration on Postprandial Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Responses in Adolescents" Nutrients 12, no. 3: 754. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030754

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