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Possible Involvement of Vitamin C in Periodontal Disease-Diabetes Mellitus Association

1
Department of Pharmacology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 200349 Craiova, Romania
2
Department of Immunology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 200349 Craiova, Romania
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Department of Periodontology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 200349 Craiova, Romania
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Department of Pharmacoeconomics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 200349 Craiova, Romania
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Department of Microbiology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 200349 Craiova, Romania
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Department of Surgery, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa”, 700115 Iasi, Romania
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Department of Internal Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa”, 700115 Iasi, Romania
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Department of Biochemistry, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa”, 700115 Iasi, Romania
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered first authors.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 553; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020553
Received: 1 February 2020 / Revised: 16 February 2020 / Accepted: 17 February 2020 / Published: 20 February 2020
Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an important water-soluble vitamin found in many fruits and vegetables. It has well-documented beneficial effects on the human body and is used as a supplement, alone or in combination with other vitamins and minerals. Over recent years, research has focused on possible new therapeutic actions in chronic conditions including periodontal disease (PD). We conducted a systematic review on clinical trials from four databases (PubMed, Clinical Trials, Cochrane, Web of Science) which measured plasmatic/salivary levels of ascorbic acid in PD–diabetes mellitus (DM) association. Six studies were included in our review, three of them analyzing patients with different grades of PD and DM who received vitamin C as a treatment (500 mg vitamin C/day for 2 months and 450 mg/day for 2 weeks) or as part of their alimentation (guava fruits), in combination with standard therapies and procedures. Decreased levels of vitamin C were observed in PD patients with DM but data about efficacy of vitamin C administration are inconclusive. Given the important bidirectional relationship between PD and DM, there is a strong need for more research to assess the positive effects of ascorbic acid supplementation in individuals suffering from both diseases and also its proper regimen for these patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin C; ascorbic acid; diabetes mellitus; periodontal disease vitamin C; ascorbic acid; diabetes mellitus; periodontal disease
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Bogdan, M.; Meca, A.D.; Boldeanu, M.V.; Gheorghe, D.N.; Turcu-Stiolica, A.; Subtirelu, M.-S.; Boldeanu, L.; Blaj, M.; Botnariu, G.E.; Vlad, C.E.; Foia, L.G.; Surlin, P. Possible Involvement of Vitamin C in Periodontal Disease-Diabetes Mellitus Association. Nutrients 2020, 12, 553.

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