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Bisphenol S in Food Causes Hormonal and Obesogenic Effects Comparable to or Worse than Bisphenol A: A Literature Review

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Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Żołnierska 14C str., 10-561 Olsztyn, Poland
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Department of Clinical Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Oczapowskiego Str. 13, 10-718 Olsztyn, Poland
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Department of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, University of Warmia and Mazury, 10-082 Olsztyn, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 532; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020532
Received: 23 January 2020 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 14 February 2020 / Published: 19 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutritional Epidemiology)
In recent years, bisphenol analogues such as bisphenol S (BPS) have come to replace bisphenol A in food packaging and food containers, since bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to leach into food and water, causing numerous negative health effects. Unfortunately, little or no research was done to determine the safety of these BPA-free products before they were marketed to the public as a healthier alternative. The latest studies have shown that some of these bisphenol analogues may be even more harmful than the original BPA in some situations. This article used a literature survey to investigate the bisphenol analogue BPS and compare it to BPA and other analogues with regards to increased obesity, metabolic disorders, cancer, and reproductive defects; among others. It was found that BPS works via different pathways than does BPA while causing equivalent obesogenic effects, such as activating preadipocytes, and that BPS was correlated with metabolic disorders, such as gestational diabetes, that BPA was not correlated with. BPS was also shown to be more toxic to the reproductive system than BPA and was shown to hormonally promote certain breast cancers at the same rate as BPA. Therefore, a strong argument may be made to regulate BPS in exactly the same manner as BPA. View Full-Text
Keywords: bisphenol analogues; food packaging; obesogenic effects; metabolic disorders bisphenol analogues; food packaging; obesogenic effects; metabolic disorders
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Thoene, M.; Dzika, E.; Gonkowski, S.; Wojtkiewicz, J. Bisphenol S in Food Causes Hormonal and Obesogenic Effects Comparable to or Worse than Bisphenol A: A Literature Review. Nutrients 2020, 12, 532.

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