Next Article in Journal
A Diterpenoid, 14-Deoxy-11, 12-Didehydroandrographolide, in Andrographis paniculata Reduces Steatohepatitis and Liver Injury in Mice Fed a High-Fat and High-Cholesterol Diet
Previous Article in Journal
Plasma Peptide Concentrations and Peptide-Reactive Immunoglobulins in Patients with Eating Disorders at Inclusion in the French EDILS Cohort (Eating Disorders Inventory and Longitudinal Survey)
Open AccessArticle

The Effect of Birch Pollen Immunotherapy on Apple and rMal d 1 Challenges in Adults with Apple Allergy

1
Department of Internal Medicine, section Allergology & Clinical immunology, Erasmus Medical Centre, 3000CA Rotterdam, the Netherlands
2
Department of Pulmonary Medicine Franciscus Gasthuis & Vlietland, 3045PM Rotterdam, The Netherlands
3
Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Wien, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 519; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020519
Received: 13 January 2020 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 14 February 2020 / Published: 18 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutritional Immunology)
Background: A proportion of patients allergic to birch pollen are also allergic to pit fruit. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of immunotherapy with birch pollen on birch-pollen-related apple allergy. Method: Patients with birch pollen immunotherapy underwent a skin-prick test with birch pollen, apple and rMal d 1, global assessments and nasal challenges with birch pollen, open food challenge with apple and a double-blind, placebo-controlled test with rMal d 1 at the start of and during the immunotherapy. Measurements of specific IgE in response to Bet v 1 and rMal d 1 and IgG4 in response to Bet v 1 and rMal d 1 took place. Results: Six of eight patients demonstrated an improvement of nasal challenge test results and all patients improved on global assessment during the immunotherapy. The median oral dose of apple required to elicit a reaction increased but was not statistically significant. The patients showed a decrease in skin-prick test values in response to birch pollen (1.05 to 0.36), apple (0.78 to 0.25) and rMal d 1 (0.51 to 0.10) with p-values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.06, respectively and a decrease of specific IgE in response to Bet v 1 (10.66 kU/L to 5.19 kU/L) and rMal d 1 (0.99 to 0.61 kU/L) with p-values of 0.01 and 0.05, respectively. Only the median specific IgG4 value to Bet v 1 increased from 0.05 to 1.85 mg/L (p-value of 0.02) and not to IgG4 rMal d 1 (0.07 to 0.08 kU/L). Conclusion: The beneficial effects of immunotherapy for birch pollen were accompanied by a limited effect on apple allergy. View Full-Text
Keywords: allergy; food; immunotherapy; birch pollen; apple; Mal d 1 allergy; food; immunotherapy; birch pollen; apple; Mal d 1
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

van der Valk, J.; Nagl, B.; Wljk, R.G.; Bohle, B.; de Jong, N. The Effect of Birch Pollen Immunotherapy on Apple and rMal d 1 Challenges in Adults with Apple Allergy. Nutrients 2020, 12, 519.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop