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Motivating Pulse-Centric Eating Patterns to Benefit Human and Environmental Well-Being

1
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
2
Cancer Prevention Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3500; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113500
Received: 27 October 2020 / Revised: 11 November 2020 / Accepted: 12 November 2020 / Published: 14 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Legumes in the Modulation of Chronic Diseases)
Pulses (e.g., lentil, common bean, chickpea, and dry pea) are linked to a myriad of positive human and environmental health impacts, making them an ideal food for wise and conscientious global citizens. In addition, pulses are affordable and shelf-stable. The combination of these factors, an elevated consumer interest in plant-based diets, and the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in increased purchasing of pulses and even empty grocery store shelves. Although pulses have many associated benefits, some consumers are hesitant to regularly eat pulses, claiming concerns of abdominal discomfort or a lack of knowledge on how to best prepare pulses. To capitalize on increased consumer interest and purchasing of pulses, now is the time for outreach efforts that address these concerns and the positive outcomes associated with pulses, thereby promoting public and environmental health. Consumers must actively decide to add pulses to their grocery lists and incorporate them into their regular eating patterns. Motivation to adopt new eating habits is essential because knowledge alone does not result in behavior change. Thus, to mitigate perceived barriers and drive consumption, we suggest application of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model and emphasis of three main benefits of pulses as motivators: (1) culinary versatility, (2) sustainability, and (3) healthfulness. View Full-Text
Keywords: pulses; legumes; microbiome; obesity; sustainability; chronic disease prevention; food security; behavior change; motivation pulses; legumes; microbiome; obesity; sustainability; chronic disease prevention; food security; behavior change; motivation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Didinger, C.; Thompson, H. Motivating Pulse-Centric Eating Patterns to Benefit Human and Environmental Well-Being. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3500. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113500

AMA Style

Didinger C, Thompson H. Motivating Pulse-Centric Eating Patterns to Benefit Human and Environmental Well-Being. Nutrients. 2020; 12(11):3500. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113500

Chicago/Turabian Style

Didinger, Chelsea; Thompson, Henry. 2020. "Motivating Pulse-Centric Eating Patterns to Benefit Human and Environmental Well-Being" Nutrients 12, no. 11: 3500. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113500

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