Next Article in Journal
Iodine Status and Thyroid Function in a Group of Seaweed Consumers in Norway
Previous Article in Journal
A Modified Recommended Food Score Is Inversely Associated with High Blood Pressure in Korean Adults
Article

Evaluation of the Accurateness of the Nutritional Labels of Processed and Ultra-Processed Products Available in Supermarkets of Ecuador

1
Research Group Public Health, Food and Physical Activity in the Life Cycle, Medical Sciences Faculty, University of Cuenca, Av. 12 abril. Campus Paraíso, Cuenca 010104, Ecuador
2
Center for Health and Nutrition Research, Mexican National Institute of Public Health Av. Universidad 655, Santa María Ahuacatitlán, 62100 Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico
3
El Colegio de Chihuahua, Partido Díaz 4723, Progresista, Ciudad Juárez, 32310 Chihuahua, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3481; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113481
Received: 26 September 2020 / Revised: 26 October 2020 / Accepted: 29 October 2020 / Published: 13 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Nutrition labeling is a public health tool that allows consumers to choose healthier foods and beverages. For this reason, there are protocols in place to monitor the food environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the consistency of nutrition labeling on packages for processed and ultra-processed products (UPPs) found at the main supermarkets in Cuenca, Ecuador. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study in which we identified label components on the packages of 1725 foods and beverages—including the nutrition table, statement on sweeteners, ingredient list, and the traffic light (TL) label—and determined the degree of consistency between the indicators reported on the traffic light label and those obtained from the information in the nutrition table. We found that 24% of products had inconsistencies in the traffic light label, and 10.9% of products had inconsistencies in the indicator for sugar specifically. The majority of inconsistencies were in the medium indicators for sugar (K = 0.68) and fat (0.75). The products with a medium indicator for sugar had a 1.98 (p < 0.05, 95% CI 1.15, 3.39) times higher chance of having inconsistencies in comparison with the low indicator. Health authorities must create new guidelines to allow for continued monitoring of the nutrition and traffic light labels on products accessible to consumers. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition label; traffic light label; ultra-processed products; sweeteners; obesity nutrition label; traffic light label; ultra-processed products; sweeteners; obesity
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Morales-Avilez, D.; Cruz-Casarrubias, C.; Tolentino-Mayo, L.; Encalada-Torres, L.; Abril-Ulloa, V. Evaluation of the Accurateness of the Nutritional Labels of Processed and Ultra-Processed Products Available in Supermarkets of Ecuador. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3481. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113481

AMA Style

Morales-Avilez D, Cruz-Casarrubias C, Tolentino-Mayo L, Encalada-Torres L, Abril-Ulloa V. Evaluation of the Accurateness of the Nutritional Labels of Processed and Ultra-Processed Products Available in Supermarkets of Ecuador. Nutrients. 2020; 12(11):3481. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113481

Chicago/Turabian Style

Morales-Avilez, Diana, Carlos Cruz-Casarrubias, Lizbeth Tolentino-Mayo, Lorena Encalada-Torres, and Victoria Abril-Ulloa. 2020. "Evaluation of the Accurateness of the Nutritional Labels of Processed and Ultra-Processed Products Available in Supermarkets of Ecuador" Nutrients 12, no. 11: 3481. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113481

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop