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A Modified Recommended Food Score Is Inversely Associated with High Blood Pressure in Korean Adults

by 1,2, 3, 1,2,* and 1,2,*
1
Department of Nutritional Science and Food Management, Ewha Womans University, 52, Ewhayeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03760, Korea
2
System Health & Engineering Major in Graduate School, Ewha Womans University, 52, Ewhayeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03760, Korea
3
Department of Food and Nutrition, Dongduk Women’s University, 60, Hwarang-ro 13-gil, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02748, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3479; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113479
Received: 7 October 2020 / Revised: 3 November 2020 / Accepted: 10 November 2020 / Published: 12 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutritional Epidemiology)
Hypertension is associated with an increase in cardiovascular disease and mortality. The interplay between dietary intake—especially sodium intake—and high blood pressure highlights the importance of understanding the role of eating patterns on cardiometabolic risk factors. This study investigates the relationship between a modified version of the Recommended Food Score (RFS) and hypertension in 8389 adults aged 19–64 years from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013–2015. A dish-based, semi-quantitative, 112-item food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intakes. Modified RFS (mRFS) is based on the reported consumption of foods recommended in the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet modified for Korean foods. High blood pressure included hypertension and prehypertension, also known as stage 1 hypertension. Men and women with the highest quintile of mRFS had a 27.2% (OR: 0.728, 95% CI: 0.545–0.971, p-trend = 0.0289) and 32.9% (OR: 0.671, 95% CI: 0.519–0.867, p-trend = 0.0087) lower prevalence of high blood pressure than those with the lowest quintile of mRFS, respectively. Our finding suggests that a higher mRFS may be associated with a lower prevalence of high blood pressure among the Korean adult population. View Full-Text
Keywords: high blood pressure; hypertension; Recommended Food Score (RFS); modified Recommended Food Score (mRFS); Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet; KNHANES high blood pressure; hypertension; Recommended Food Score (RFS); modified Recommended Food Score (mRFS); Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet; KNHANES
MDPI and ACS Style

Han, K.; Yang, Y.J.; Kim, H.; Kwon, O. A Modified Recommended Food Score Is Inversely Associated with High Blood Pressure in Korean Adults. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3479. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113479

AMA Style

Han K, Yang YJ, Kim H, Kwon O. A Modified Recommended Food Score Is Inversely Associated with High Blood Pressure in Korean Adults. Nutrients. 2020; 12(11):3479. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113479

Chicago/Turabian Style

Han, Kyuyoung, Yoon J. Yang, Hyesook Kim, and Oran Kwon. 2020. "A Modified Recommended Food Score Is Inversely Associated with High Blood Pressure in Korean Adults" Nutrients 12, no. 11: 3479. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113479

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