Next Article in Journal
The Impact of Food Histamine Intake on Asthma Activity: A Pilot Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Food Addiction and Psychosocial Adversity: Biological Embedding, Contextual Factors, and Public Health Implications
Previous Article in Journal
Diet Influences the Oral Microbiota of Infants during the First Six Months of Life
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Clinical Utility of Food Addiction: Characteristics and Psychosocial Impairments in a Treatment-Seeking Sample
Open AccessArticle

Ultraprocessed Food: Addictive, Toxic, and Ready for Regulation

by 1,2,3
1
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
2
Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
3
Department of Research, Touro University-California, Vallejo, CA 94592, USA
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3401; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113401
Received: 27 September 2020 / Revised: 19 October 2020 / Accepted: 23 October 2020 / Published: 5 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Clinical Utility of Food Addiction and Eating Addiction)
Past public health crises (e.g., tobacco, alcohol, opioids, cholera, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lead, pollution, venereal disease, even coronavirus (COVID-19) have been met with interventions targeted both at the individual and all of society. While the healthcare community is very aware that the global pandemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has its origins in our Western ultraprocessed food diet, society has been slow to initiate any interventions other than public education, which has been ineffective, in part due to food industry interference. This article provides the rationale for such public health interventions, by compiling the evidence that added sugar, and by proxy the ultraprocessed food category, meets the four criteria set by the public health community as necessary and sufficient for regulation—abuse, toxicity, ubiquity, and externalities (How does your consumption affect me?). To their credit, some countries have recently heeded this science and have instituted sugar taxation policies to help ameliorate NCDs within their borders. This article also supplies scientific counters to food industry talking points, and sample intervention strategies, in order to guide both scientists and policy makers in instituting further appropriate public health measures to quell this pandemic. View Full-Text
Keywords: processed food; nutrition; non-communicable disease; metabolic syndrome; diabetes; addiction; policy processed food; nutrition; non-communicable disease; metabolic syndrome; diabetes; addiction; policy
MDPI and ACS Style

Lustig, R.H. Ultraprocessed Food: Addictive, Toxic, and Ready for Regulation. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3401. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113401

AMA Style

Lustig RH. Ultraprocessed Food: Addictive, Toxic, and Ready for Regulation. Nutrients. 2020; 12(11):3401. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113401

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lustig, Robert H. 2020. "Ultraprocessed Food: Addictive, Toxic, and Ready for Regulation" Nutrients 12, no. 11: 3401. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113401

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop