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Article

Inulin Supplementation Disturbs Hepatic Cholesterol and Bile Acid Metabolism Independent from Housing Temperature

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany
2
Department of Internal Medicine I, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3200; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103200
Received: 18 September 2020 / Revised: 16 October 2020 / Accepted: 17 October 2020 / Published: 20 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Dietary Intake for Liver-Related Diseases)
Dietary fibers are fermented by gut bacteria into the major short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, propionate, and butyrate. Generally, fiber-rich diets are believed to improve metabolic health. However, recent studies suggest that long-term supplementation with fibers causes changes in hepatic bile acid metabolism, hepatocyte damage, and hepatocellular cancer in dysbiotic mice. Alterations in hepatic bile acid metabolism have also been reported after cold-induced activation of brown adipose tissue. Here, we aim to investigate the effects of short-term dietary inulin supplementation on liver cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in control and cold housed specific pathogen free wild type (WT) mice. We found that short-term inulin feeding lowered plasma cholesterol levels and provoked cholestasis and mild liver damage in WT mice. Of note, inulin feeding caused marked perturbations in bile acid metabolism, which were aggravated by cold treatment. Our studies indicate that even relatively short periods of inulin consumption in mice with an intact gut microbiome have detrimental effects on liver metabolism and function. View Full-Text
Keywords: fiber; inulin; short chain fatty acids; bile acids; cholestasis fiber; inulin; short chain fatty acids; bile acids; cholestasis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pauly, M.J.; Rohde, J.K.; John, C.; Evangelakos, I.; Koop, A.C.; Pertzborn, P.; Tödter, K.; Scheja, L.; Heeren, J.; Worthmann, A. Inulin Supplementation Disturbs Hepatic Cholesterol and Bile Acid Metabolism Independent from Housing Temperature. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3200. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103200

AMA Style

Pauly MJ, Rohde JK, John C, Evangelakos I, Koop AC, Pertzborn P, Tödter K, Scheja L, Heeren J, Worthmann A. Inulin Supplementation Disturbs Hepatic Cholesterol and Bile Acid Metabolism Independent from Housing Temperature. Nutrients. 2020; 12(10):3200. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103200

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pauly, Mira J., Julia K. Rohde, Clara John, Ioannis Evangelakos, Anja C. Koop, Paul Pertzborn, Klaus Tödter, Ludger Scheja, Joerg Heeren, and Anna Worthmann. 2020. "Inulin Supplementation Disturbs Hepatic Cholesterol and Bile Acid Metabolism Independent from Housing Temperature" Nutrients 12, no. 10: 3200. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103200

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