Next Article in Journal
The Cardiotonic Steroid Marinobufagenin Is a Predictor of Increased Left Ventricular Mass in Obesity: The African-PREDICT Study
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Tryptophan Intake and Metabolism in Older Adults with Mood Disorders
Open AccessReview

Diet to Reduce the Metabolic Syndrome Associated with Menopause. The Logic for Olive Oil

1
Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Clínico Universitario—INCLIVA, Av Blasco Ibáñez 17, 46010 Valencia, Spain
2
Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Valencia, Burjassot, and INCLIVA, Av Blasco Ibáñez 17, 46010 Valencia, Spain
3
Department of Cellular Biology, Functional Biology and Physical Anthropology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Valencia, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia, Spain
4
Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Valencia, Av Blasco Ibáñez 15, 46010 Valencia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3184; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103184
Received: 14 September 2020 / Revised: 13 October 2020 / Accepted: 14 October 2020 / Published: 18 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimising Nutrition to Alleviate Age-Associated Functional Decline)
The rates of metabolic syndrome are increasing in parallel with the increasing prevalence of obesity, primarily due to its concomitant insulin resistance. This is particularly concerning for women, as the years around menopause are accompanied by an increase in visceral obesity, a strong determinant of insulin resistance. A fall in estrogens and increase in the androgen/estrogen ratio is attributed a determining role in this process, which has been confirmed in other physiological models, such as polycystic ovary syndrome. A healthy lifestyle, with special emphasis on nutrition, has been recommended as a first-line strategy in consensuses and guidelines. A consistent body of evidence has accumulated suggesting that the Mediterranean diet, with olive oil as a vital component, has both health benefits and acceptable adherence. Herein, we provide an updated overview of current knowledge on the benefits of olive oil most relevant to menopause-associated metabolic syndrome, including an analysis of the components with the greatest health impact, their effect on basic mechanisms of disease, and the state of the art regarding their action on the main features of metabolic syndrome. View Full-Text
Keywords: olive oil; metabolic syndrome; obesity; women; menopause; healthy ageing olive oil; metabolic syndrome; obesity; women; menopause; healthy ageing
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Hidalgo-Mora, J.J.; Cortés-Sierra, L.; García-Pérez, M.-Á.; Tarín, J.J.; Cano, A. Diet to Reduce the Metabolic Syndrome Associated with Menopause. The Logic for Olive Oil. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3184.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop