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Article

Sweet Taste Antagonist Lactisole Administered in Combination with Sucrose, But Not Glucose, Increases Energy Intake and Decreases Peripheral Serotonin in Male Subjects

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Department of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria
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Christian Doppler Laboratory for Taste Research, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria
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Symrise AG, Muehlenfeldstrasse 1, 37603 Holzminden, Germany
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Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, 85345 Freising, Germany
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Chair of Nutritional Systems Biology, School of Life Sciences, Technical University of Munich, Lise-Meitner-Str. 34, 85345 Freising, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3133; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103133
Received: 9 September 2020 / Revised: 30 September 2020 / Accepted: 6 October 2020 / Published: 14 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Metabolism)
Knowledge regarding the involvement of sweetness perception on energy intake is scarce. Here, the impact of glucose and sucrose sweetness, beyond their caloric load, on subsequent food intake and biomarkers of satiation was evaluated by co-administration of the sweet taste receptor inhibitor lactisole. A total of 27 healthy, male subjects received solutions of either 10% glucose w/o 60 ppm lactisole or 10% sucrose w/o 60 ppm lactisole. Subsequent food intake from a standardized breakfast was evaluated 2 h after receiving the respective test solution. Changes in postprandial plasma concentrations of cholecystokinin, ghrelin, and serotonin were determined over a period of 120 min, as was the body temperature. Administration of lactisole to the sucrose solution increased the energy intake from the subsequent standardized breakfast by 12.9 ± 5.8% (p = 0.04), led to a decreased Δ AUC of the body core temperature by 46 ± 20% (p = 0.01), and time-dependently reduced Δ serotonin plasma concentrations (−16.9 ± 6.06 ng/mL vs. −0.56 ± 3.7 ng/mL after sucrose administration, p = 0.03). The present study shows that lactisole increases energy intake and decreases plasma serotonin concentrations as well as body core temperature induced by sucrose, but not glucose. This finding may be associated with the different binding affinities of sucrose and glucose to the sweet taste receptor. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy intake; sweet taste; peripheral serotonin; sucrose; glucose; lactisole; sugar-sweetened beverages energy intake; sweet taste; peripheral serotonin; sucrose; glucose; lactisole; sugar-sweetened beverages
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schweiger, K.; Grüneis, V.; Treml, J.; Galassi, C.; Karl, C.M.; Ley, J.P.; Krammer, G.E.; Lieder, B.; Somoza, V. Sweet Taste Antagonist Lactisole Administered in Combination with Sucrose, But Not Glucose, Increases Energy Intake and Decreases Peripheral Serotonin in Male Subjects. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3133. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103133

AMA Style

Schweiger K, Grüneis V, Treml J, Galassi C, Karl CM, Ley JP, Krammer GE, Lieder B, Somoza V. Sweet Taste Antagonist Lactisole Administered in Combination with Sucrose, But Not Glucose, Increases Energy Intake and Decreases Peripheral Serotonin in Male Subjects. Nutrients. 2020; 12(10):3133. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103133

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schweiger, Kerstin, Verena Grüneis, Julia Treml, Claudia Galassi, Corinna M. Karl, Jakob P. Ley, Gerhard E. Krammer, Barbara Lieder, and Veronika Somoza. 2020. "Sweet Taste Antagonist Lactisole Administered in Combination with Sucrose, But Not Glucose, Increases Energy Intake and Decreases Peripheral Serotonin in Male Subjects" Nutrients 12, no. 10: 3133. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103133

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