Next Article in Journal
Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of S. Aureus Bacteremia in Patients Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition
Next Article in Special Issue
Glycemic Variability and CNS Inflammation: Reviewing the Connection
Previous Article in Journal
Effect of a Short-Time Probiotic Supplementation on the Abundance of the Main Constituents of the Gut Microbiota of Term Newborns Delivered by Cesarean Section—A Randomized, Prospective, Controlled Clinical Trial
Previous Article in Special Issue
Physiologic Effects of Exogenous Dextrose in Murine Klebsiella pneumoniae Sepsis Vary by Route of Provision
Article

Identification of Inflammatory and Disease-Associated Plasma Proteins that Associate with Intake of Added Sugar and Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Their Role in Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, 214 28 Malmö, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3129; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103129
Received: 21 September 2020 / Revised: 9 October 2020 / Accepted: 10 October 2020 / Published: 14 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Influence of Carbohydrates Intake on Inflammation)
It has been suggested that high intake of added sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increase the level of circulating inflammatory proteins and that chronic inflammation plays a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. We aim to examine how added sugar and SSB intake associate with 136 measured plasma proteins and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the Malmö Diet and Cancer–Cardiovascular Cohort (n = 4382), and examine if the identified added sugar- and SSB-associated proteins associate with T2D incidence. A two-step iterative resampling approach was used to internally replicate proteins that associated with added sugar and SSB intake. Nine proteins were identified to associate with added sugar intake, of which only two associated with T2D incidence (p < 0.00045). Seven proteins were identified to associate with SSB intake, of which six associated strongly with T2D incidence (p < 6.9 × 10−8). No significant associations were observed between added sugar and SSB intake and CRP concentrations. In summary, our elucidation of the relationship between plasma proteome and added sugar and SSB intake, in relation to future T2D risk, demonstrated that SSB intake, rather than the total intake of added sugar, was related to a T2D-pathological proteomic signature. However, external replication is needed to verify the findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: added sugar; sugar-sweetened beverages; inflammation; inflammatory proteins; proteomics; type 2 diabetes added sugar; sugar-sweetened beverages; inflammation; inflammatory proteins; proteomics; type 2 diabetes
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Ramne, S.; Drake, I.; Ericson, U.; Nilsson, J.; Orho-Melander, M.; Engström, G.; Sonestedt, E. Identification of Inflammatory and Disease-Associated Plasma Proteins that Associate with Intake of Added Sugar and Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Their Role in Type 2 Diabetes Risk. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3129. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103129

AMA Style

Ramne S, Drake I, Ericson U, Nilsson J, Orho-Melander M, Engström G, Sonestedt E. Identification of Inflammatory and Disease-Associated Plasma Proteins that Associate with Intake of Added Sugar and Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Their Role in Type 2 Diabetes Risk. Nutrients. 2020; 12(10):3129. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103129

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ramne, Stina, Isabel Drake, Ulrika Ericson, Jan Nilsson, Marju Orho-Melander, Gunnar Engström, and Emily Sonestedt. 2020. "Identification of Inflammatory and Disease-Associated Plasma Proteins that Associate with Intake of Added Sugar and Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Their Role in Type 2 Diabetes Risk" Nutrients 12, no. 10: 3129. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103129

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop