Next Article in Journal
The Change in the Content of Nutrients in Diets Eliminating Products of Animal Origin in Comparison to a Regular Diet from the Area of Middle-Eastern Europe
Previous Article in Journal
Influence of Nutritional Intake of Carbohydrates on Mitochondrial Structure, Dynamics, and Functions during Adipogenesis
Previous Article in Special Issue
Immunonutrition in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer Undergoing Surgical Intervention: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
Open AccessReview

Dietary Factors and Supplements Influencing Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Concentrations in Men with Prostate Cancer and Increased Cancer Risk: An Evidence Analysis Review Based on Randomized Controlled Trials

1
Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Biopolis, GR-41334 Larissa, Greece
2
Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, University Campus, GR-54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
3
Institute for the Study of Urological Diseases (ISUD), 33 Nikis Avenue, GR-54622 Thessaloniki, Greece
4
1st Department of Urology and Center for Sexual and Reproductive Health, G. Gennimatas—Aghios Demetrius General Hospital, 41 Ethnikis Amynis Street, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54635 Thessaloniki, Greece
5
Laboratory of Histology and Embryology, Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
6
Division of Transplantation, Immunology and Mucosal Biology, MRC Centre for Transplantation, King’s College London Medical School, London SE5 9RS, UK
7
Unit of Reproductive Endocrinology, 1st Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-56429 Thessaloniki, Greece
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Equal contribution in the manuscript.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 2985; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12102985
Received: 7 September 2020 / Revised: 19 September 2020 / Accepted: 24 September 2020 / Published: 29 September 2020
The quest for dietary patterns and supplements efficient in down-regulating prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations among men with prostate cancer (PCa) or increased PCa risk has been long. Several antioxidants, including lycopene, selenium, curcumin, coenzyme Q10, phytoestrogens (including isoflavones and flavonoids), green tea catechins, cernitin, vitamins (C, E, D) and multivitamins, medicinal mushrooms (Ganoderma lucidum), fruit extracts (saw palmetto, cranberries, pomegranate), walnuts and fatty acids, as well as combined supplementations of all, have been examined in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in humans, on the primary, secondary, and tertiary PCa prevention level. Despite the plethora of trials and the variety of examined interventions, the evidence supporting the efficacy of most dietary factors appears inadequate to recommend their use. View Full-Text
Keywords: malignancy; obesity; benign prostate hyperplasia; prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia; dietary supplements; polyphenols; genistein; resveratrol; sulforaphane; Serenoa repens malignancy; obesity; benign prostate hyperplasia; prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia; dietary supplements; polyphenols; genistein; resveratrol; sulforaphane; Serenoa repens
MDPI and ACS Style

Grammatikopoulou, M.G.; Gkiouras, K.; Papageorgiou, S.Τ.; Myrogiannis, I.; Mykoniatis, I.; Papamitsou, T.; Bogdanos, D.P.; Goulis, D.G. Dietary Factors and Supplements Influencing Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Concentrations in Men with Prostate Cancer and Increased Cancer Risk: An Evidence Analysis Review Based on Randomized Controlled Trials. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2985.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop