Next Article in Journal
Enteral Nutrition in Adult Crohn’s Disease: Toward a Paradigm Shift
Next Article in Special Issue
Heart Histopathology and Mitochondrial Ultrastructure in Aged Rats Fed for 24 Months on Different Unsaturated Fats (Virgin Olive Oil, Sunflower Oil or Fish Oil) and Affected by Different Longevity
Previous Article in Journal
Impact of FODMAP Content Restrictions on the Quality of Diet for Patients with Celiac Disease on a Gluten-Free Diet
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sugar Beet Pectin Supplementation Did Not Alter Profiles of Fecal Microbiota and Exhaled Breath in Healthy Young Adults and Healthy Elderly
Review

The Paradox of Coenzyme Q10 in Aging

1
Institute of Biotechnology, Department of Physiology, Biomedical Research Center, University of Granada, Avda del Conocimiento sn, 18016 Granada, Spain
2
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fragilidad y Envejecimiento Saludable (CIBERFES), 18016 Granada, Spain
3
Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix Verdú”, Department of Physiology, Biomedical Research Center, University of Granada, Avda del Conocimiento sn, 18016 Granada, Spain
4
Department of Clinical Sicences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona, Italy
5
Nutrition and Food Science Group, Department of Analytical and Food Chemistry, CITACA, CACTI, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain
6
International Research Center for Food Nutrition and Safety, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The two authors contributed equally.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2221; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092221
Received: 9 August 2019 / Revised: 6 September 2019 / Accepted: 8 September 2019 / Published: 14 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Diet and Longevity)
Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential endogenously synthesized molecule that links different metabolic pathways to mitochondrial energy production thanks to its location in the mitochondrial inner membrane and its redox capacity, which also provide it with the capability to work as an antioxidant. Although defects in CoQ biosynthesis in human and mouse models cause CoQ deficiency syndrome, some animals models with particular defects in the CoQ biosynthetic pathway have shown an increase in life span, a fact that has been attributed to the concept of mitohormesis. Paradoxically, CoQ levels decline in some tissues in human and rodents during aging and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation has shown benefits as an anti-aging agent, especially under certain conditions associated with increased oxidative stress. Also, CoQ10 has shown therapeutic benefits in aging-related disorders, particularly in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Thus, we discuss the paradox of health benefits due to a defect in the CoQ biosynthetic pathway or exogenous supplementation of CoQ10. View Full-Text
Keywords: mitohormesis; antioxidant; mitochondria; anti-aging; diet; aging-related diseases mitohormesis; antioxidant; mitochondria; anti-aging; diet; aging-related diseases
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Díaz-Casado, M.E.; Quiles, J.L.; Barriocanal-Casado, E.; González-García, P.; Battino, M.; López, L.C.; Varela-López, A. The Paradox of Coenzyme Q10 in Aging. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2221. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092221

AMA Style

Díaz-Casado ME, Quiles JL, Barriocanal-Casado E, González-García P, Battino M, López LC, Varela-López A. The Paradox of Coenzyme Q10 in Aging. Nutrients. 2019; 11(9):2221. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092221

Chicago/Turabian Style

Díaz-Casado, M. Elena, José L. Quiles, Eliana Barriocanal-Casado, Pilar González-García, Maurizio Battino, Luis C. López, and Alfonso Varela-López. 2019. "The Paradox of Coenzyme Q10 in Aging" Nutrients 11, no. 9: 2221. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092221

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop