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Open AccessArticle

Changing Sodium Knowledge, Attitudes and Intended Behaviours Using Web-Based Dietary Assessment Tools: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

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Faculty of Health Sciences, Ontario Tech University, 2000 Simcoe St. North, Science Building, Rm 3016, Oshawa, ON L1G 0C5, Canada
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Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building, 1 King’s College Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2186; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092186
Received: 31 July 2019 / Revised: 26 August 2019 / Accepted: 5 September 2019 / Published: 11 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Dietary Sodium Research to Improve Human Health)
Despite public health efforts to reduce dietary sodium, sodium intakes in most countries remains high. The purpose of this study was to determine if using novel web-based tools that provide tailored feedback, the Sodium Calculator and Sodium Calculator Plus, improves users’ sodium-related knowledge, attitudes, and intended behaviours (KAB). In this single arm pre- and post-test study, 199 healthy adults aged 18–34 years completed a validated questionnaire to assess changes to sodium-related KAB before and after using the calculators. After using the calculators, the proportion of participants who accurately identified the sodium adequate intake and chronic disease risk reduction level increased (19% to 74% and 23% to 74%, respectively, both p = 0.021). The proportion accurately self-assessing their sodium intake as ‘high’ also increased (41% to 66%, p = 0.021). Several intended behavioural changes were reported, i.e., buying foods with sodium-reduced labels, using the Nutrition Facts table, using spices and herbs instead of salt, and limiting eating out. Evidence-based eHealth tools that assess and provide personalized feedback on sodium intake have the potential to aid in facilitating sodium reduction in individuals. This study is an important first step in evaluating and optimizing the implementation of eHealth tools to help reduce Canadians’ sodium intakes. View Full-Text
Keywords: sodium; dietary assessment; knowledge; attitudes and behaviours; sodium policy sodium; dietary assessment; knowledge; attitudes and behaviours; sodium policy
MDPI and ACS Style

Jefferson, K.; Semnani-Azad, Z.; Wong, C.; L’Abbé, M.R.; Arcand, J. Changing Sodium Knowledge, Attitudes and Intended Behaviours Using Web-Based Dietary Assessment Tools: A Proof-Of-Concept Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2186.

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