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Open AccessCommunication

Dietary Fiber and Gut Microbiota in Renal Diets

1
Luigi Sacco Hospital, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, 20157 Milano, Italy
2
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine; University of Pisa, Pisa 56126, Italy
3
Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences “Luigi Sacco”, Università di Milano, 20157 Milano, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2149; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092149
Received: 20 June 2019 / Revised: 23 August 2019 / Accepted: 26 August 2019 / Published: 9 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Fiber and Human Health)
Nutrition is crucial for the management of patients affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD) to slow down disease progression and to correct symptoms. The mainstay of the nutritional approach to renal patients is protein restriction coupled with adequate energy supply to prevent malnutrition. However, other aspects of renal diets, including fiber content, can be beneficial. This paper summarizes the latest literature on the role of different types of dietary fiber in CKD, with special attention to gut microbiota and the potential protective role of renal diets. Fibers have been identified based on aqueous solubility, but other features, such as viscosity, fermentability, and bulking effect in the colon should be considered. A proper amount of fiber should be recommended not only in the general population but also in CKD patients, to achieve an adequate composition and metabolism of gut microbiota and to reduce the risks connected with obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. View Full-Text
Keywords: renal diets; fiber; renal nutrition; chronic kidney disease; gut microbiota renal diets; fiber; renal nutrition; chronic kidney disease; gut microbiota
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MDPI and ACS Style

Camerotto, C.; Cupisti, A.; D’Alessandro, C.; Muzio, F.; Gallieni, M. Dietary Fiber and Gut Microbiota in Renal Diets. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2149.

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