Next Article in Journal
Dietary Strategies for Weight Loss Maintenance
Previous Article in Journal
Association between Psychosocial Stress and Cardiovascular Disease in Relation to Low Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables in Middle-Aged Men
Previous Article in Special Issue
Healthy Planet, Healthy Youth: A Food Systems Education and Promotion Intervention to Improve Adolescent Diet Quality and Reduce Food Waste
Open AccessReview

Socio-Ecological Influences on Adolescent (Aged 10–17) Alcohol Use and Unhealthy Eating Behaviours: A Systematic Review and Synthesis of Qualitative Studies

1
School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Teesside University, Middlesbrough TS1 3BA, UK
2
Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 4AX, UK
3
School of Health and Social Care, Teesside University, Middlesbrough TS1 3BA, UK
4
Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3HN, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1914; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081914
Received: 1 July 2019 / Revised: 9 August 2019 / Accepted: 12 August 2019 / Published: 15 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Adolescent Dietary Behaviour)
  |  
PDF [585 KB, uploaded 15 August 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Excess body weight and risky alcohol consumption are two of the greatest contributors to global disease. Alcohol use contributes directly and indirectly to weight gain. Health behaviours cluster in adolescence and track to adulthood. This review identified and synthesised qualitative research to provide insight into common underlying factors influencing alcohol use and unhealthy eating behaviours amongst young people aged 10–17. Sixty two studies met inclusion criteria. Twenty eight studies focused on alcohol; 34 focused on eating behaviours. Informed by principles of thematic analysis and meta-ethnography, analysis yielded five themes: (1) use of alcohol and unhealthy food to overcome personal problems; (2) unhealthy eating and alcohol use as fun experiences; (3) food, but not alcohol, choices are based on taste; (4) control and restraint; and (5) demonstrating identity through alcohol and food choices. Young people faced pressure, reinforced by industry, to eat and drink in very specific ways, with clear social consequences if their attitudes or behaviour were deemed unacceptable. No qualitative studies were identified with an explicit and concurrent focus on adolescent eating behaviours and alcohol consumption. Further exploratory work is needed to examine the links between food and alcohol in young people’s emotional, social and cultural lives. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescent; eating; alcohol use; qualitative research; systematic review adolescent; eating; alcohol use; qualitative research; systematic review
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Scott, S.; Elamin, W.; Giles, E.L.; Hillier-Brown, F.; Byrnes, K.; Connor, N.; Newbury-Birch, D.; Ells, L. Socio-Ecological Influences on Adolescent (Aged 10–17) Alcohol Use and Unhealthy Eating Behaviours: A Systematic Review and Synthesis of Qualitative Studies. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1914.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top