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Macronutrient Analysis of Target-Pooled Donor Breast Milk and Corresponding Growth in Very Low Birth Weight Infants
Open AccessArticle

Availability of Donor Milk for Very Preterm Infants Decreased the Risk of Necrotizing Enterocolitis without Adversely Impacting Growth or Rates of Breastfeeding

1
Neonatology Department, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Universidad de Barcelona, BCNatal, 08950 Esplugues de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain
2
Neonatology Department, Hospital General Universitari Castelló, 12004 Castelló de la Plana, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1895; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081895
Received: 11 July 2019 / Revised: 8 August 2019 / Accepted: 9 August 2019 / Published: 14 August 2019
Human milk contains non-nutritional factors that promote intestinal maturation and protect against infectious and inflammatory conditions. In the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) setting, donor milk (DM) is recommended when availability of own mother’s milk (OMM) is not enough. Our aim was to compare the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and late-onset sepsis (LOS) in very preterm infants (VPI) after the introduction of DM. Growth and breastfeeding rates were examined as secondary outcomes. Single center, observational and retrospective cohort study comparing 227 VPI admitted to our neonatal unit before (Group 1, n = 99) and after (Group 2, n = 128) DM introduction. Enteral nutrition was started earlier after DM availability (2.6 ± 1.1 vs. 2.1 ± 1 days, p = 0.001). Incidence of NEC decreased in group 2 (9.1% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.055), especially in those born between 28 and 32 weeks (5.4 vs. 0.0%, p = 0.044). Surgical NEC was also less frequent. Suffering NEC was 4 times more likely in group 1 (multivariate analysis). Availability of DM did not impact breastfeeding rates or preterm growth. Our findings support the protective role of DM against NEC, particularly in non-extreme VPI, a group less frequently included in clinical guidelines and research studies on the use of DM. View Full-Text
Keywords: preterm infant; human milk; donor human milk; formula feeding; breastfeeding; necrotizing enterocolitis; growth preterm infant; human milk; donor human milk; formula feeding; breastfeeding; necrotizing enterocolitis; growth
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Cañizo Vázquez, D.; Salas García, S.; Izquierdo Renau, M.; Iglesias-Platas, I. Availability of Donor Milk for Very Preterm Infants Decreased the Risk of Necrotizing Enterocolitis without Adversely Impacting Growth or Rates of Breastfeeding. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1895.

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Nutrients, EISSN 2072-6643, Published by MDPI AG
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