Next Article in Journal
The Functional Power of the Human Milk Proteome
Next Article in Special Issue
The Short-Chain Fatty Acid Acetate in Body Weight Control and Insulin Sensitivity
Previous Article in Journal
Consumption of Nutrition Supplements Is Associated with Less Hypoglycemia during Admission—Results from the MENU Project
Previous Article in Special Issue
Cereal B-Glucans: The Impact of Processing and How It Affects Physiological Responses
Open AccessReview

Metabolic Effects of Resistant Starch Type 2: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

1
Department of Diabetes, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
2
Department of Nutrition, Dietetics & Food, Monash University, Level 1, 264 Ferntree Gully Road, Notting Hill, VIC 3168, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1833; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081833
Received: 17 June 2019 / Revised: 2 August 2019 / Accepted: 5 August 2019 / Published: 8 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Fiber and Human Health)
Published evidence exploring the effects of dietary resistant starch (RS) on human cardiometabolic health is inconsistent. This review aimed to investigate the effect of dietary RS type 2 (RS2) supplementation on body weight, satiety ratings, fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin resistance and lipid levels in healthy individuals and those with overweight/obesity, the metabolic syndrome (MetS), prediabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Five electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in English between 1982 and 2018, with trials eligible for inclusion if they reported RCTs involving humans where at least one group consumed ≥ 8 g of RS2 per day and measured body weight, satiety, glucose and/or lipid metabolic outcomes. Twenty-two RCTs involving 670 participants were included. Meta-analyses indicated that RS2 supplementation significantly reduced serum triacylglycerol concentrations (mean difference (MD) = −0.10 mmol/L; 95% CI −0.19, −0.01, P = 0.03) in healthy individuals (n = 269) and reduced body weight (MD = −1.29 kg; 95% CI −2.40, −0.17, P = 0.02) in people with T2DM (n = 90). However, these outcomes were heavily influenced by positive results from a small number of individual studies which contradicted the conclusions of the majority of trials. RS2 had no effects on any other metabolic outcomes. All studies ranged from 1–12 weeks in duration and contained small sample sizes (10–60 participants), and most had an unclear risk of bias. Short-term RS2 supplementation in humans is of limited cardiometabolic benefit. View Full-Text
Keywords: resistant starch; dietary fiber; obesity; metabolic syndrome; type 2 diabetes; metabolic health; systematic review resistant starch; dietary fiber; obesity; metabolic syndrome; type 2 diabetes; metabolic health; systematic review
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Snelson, M.; Jong, J.; Manolas, D.; Kok, S.; Louise, A.; Stern, R.; Kellow, N.J. Metabolic Effects of Resistant Starch Type 2: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1833.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop