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Open AccessArticle

Antifatigue Activity and Exercise Performance of Phenolic-Rich Extracts from Calendula officinalis, Ribes nigrum, and Vaccinium myrtillus

1
Graduate Institute of Metabolism and Obesity Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City 11031, Taiwan
2
Nutrition Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei City 11031, Taiwan
3
Graduate Institute of Sports Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan 33301, Taiwan
4
Department of Forestry, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
5
Department of Exercise and Health Science, National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Taipei 11219, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1715; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081715
Received: 22 June 2019 / Revised: 18 July 2019 / Accepted: 23 July 2019 / Published: 25 July 2019
Calendula officinalis, Ribes nigrum, and Vaccinium myrtillus (CRV) possess a high phenolic compound content with excellent antioxidant activity. Dietary antioxidants can reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress. Consumption of large amounts of phenolic compounds is positively correlated with reduction in exercise-induced muscle damage. Research for natural products to improve exercise capacity, relieve fatigue, and accelerate fatigue alleviation is ongoing. Here, CRV containing a large total phenolic content (13.4 mg/g of CRV) demonstrated antioxidant activity. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography quantification revealed 1.95 ± 0.02 mg of salidroside in 1 g of CRV. In the current study, CRV were administered to mice for five weeks, and the antifatigue effect of CRV was evaluated using the forelimb grip strength test; weight-loaded swimming test; and measurement of fatigue-related biochemical indicators, such as blood lactate, ammonia, glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatine kinase (CK) activity; and muscle and liver glycogen content. The results indicated that in CRV-treated mice, the forelimb grip strength significantly increased; weight-loaded swimming time prolonged; their lactate, ammonia, BUN, and CK activity decreased, and muscle and liver glucose and glycogen content increased compared with the vehicle group. Thus, CRV have antifatigue activity and can increase exercise tolerance. View Full-Text
Keywords: antifatigue activity; antioxidant; polyphenol; salidroside; exercise adaption antifatigue activity; antioxidant; polyphenol; salidroside; exercise adaption
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Tung, Y.-T.; Wu, M.-F.; Lee, M.-C.; Wu, J.-H.; Huang, C.-C.; Huang, W.-C. Antifatigue Activity and Exercise Performance of Phenolic-Rich Extracts from Calendula officinalis, Ribes nigrum, and Vaccinium myrtillus. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1715.

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