Next Article in Journal
Allomyrina dichotoma Larva Extract Ameliorates the Hepatic Insulin Resistance of High-Fat Diet-Induced Diabetic Mice
Previous Article in Journal
Food Consumption in Adolescents and Young Adults: Age-Specific Socio-Economic and Cultural Disparities (Belgian Food Consumption Survey 2014)
Open AccessArticle

A Mediterranean Diet with Fresh, Lean Pork Improves Processing Speed and Mood: Cognitive Findings from the MedPork Randomised Controlled Trial

1
Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, 5001 Adelaide, Australia
2
School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA 6027, Australia
3
Medical School, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Perth, WA 6000, Australia
4
Flinders Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, 5042 Adelaide, Australia
5
Cognitive Ageing and Impairment Neurosciences, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, 5005 Adelaide, Australia
6
School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, 5005 Adelaide, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1521; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071521
Received: 14 May 2019 / Revised: 20 June 2019 / Accepted: 25 June 2019 / Published: 4 July 2019
Abstract: Background: The Mediterranean diet may be capable of improving cognitive function. However, the red meat restrictions of the diet could impact long-term adherence in Western populations. The current study therefore examined the cognitive effects of a Mediterranean diet with additional red meat. Methods: A 24-week parallel crossover design compared a Mediterranean diet with 2–3 weekly servings of fresh, lean pork (MedPork) and a low-fat (LF) control diet. Thirty-five participants aged between 45 and 80 years and at risk of cardiovascular disease followed each intervention for 8 weeks, separated by an 8-week washout period. Cognitive function was assessed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Psychological well-being was measured through the SF-36 Health Survey and mood was measured using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results: During the MedPork intervention, participants consumed an average of 3 weekly servings of fresh pork. Compared to LF, the MedPork intervention led to higher processing speed performance (p = 0.01) and emotional role functioning (p = 0.03). No other significant differences were observed between diets. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that a Mediterranean diet inclusive of fresh, lean pork can be adhered to by an older non-Mediterranean population while leading to positive cognitive outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: MedDiet; protein; cognitive function; ageing; cardiovascular disease MedDiet; protein; cognitive function; ageing; cardiovascular disease
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Wade, A.T.; Davis, C.R.; Dyer, K.A.; Hodgson, J.M.; Woodman, R.J.; Keage, H.A.D.; Murphy, K.J. A Mediterranean Diet with Fresh, Lean Pork Improves Processing Speed and Mood: Cognitive Findings from the MedPork Randomised Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1521. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071521

AMA Style

Wade AT, Davis CR, Dyer KA, Hodgson JM, Woodman RJ, Keage HAD, Murphy KJ. A Mediterranean Diet with Fresh, Lean Pork Improves Processing Speed and Mood: Cognitive Findings from the MedPork Randomised Controlled Trial. Nutrients. 2019; 11(7):1521. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071521

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wade, Alexandra T.; Davis, Courtney R.; Dyer, Kathryn A.; Hodgson, Jonathan M.; Woodman, Richard J.; Keage, Hannah A.D.; Murphy, Karen J. 2019. "A Mediterranean Diet with Fresh, Lean Pork Improves Processing Speed and Mood: Cognitive Findings from the MedPork Randomised Controlled Trial" Nutrients 11, no. 7: 1521. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071521

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop