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Metabolic Syndrome—Role of Dietary Fat Type and Quantity

School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide SA 5000, Australia
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1438; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071438
Received: 27 May 2019 / Revised: 10 June 2019 / Accepted: 24 June 2019 / Published: 26 June 2019
Background: Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) over and above that related to type 2 diabetes. The optimal diet for the treatment of metabolic syndrome is not clear. Materials and Methods: A review of dietary interventions in volunteers with metabolic syndrome as well as studies examining the impact of dietary fat on the separate components of metabolic syndrome was undertaken using only recent meta-analyses, if available. Results: Most of the data suggest that replacing carbohydrates with any fat, but particularly polyunsaturated fat, will lower triglyceride(TG), increase high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and lower blood pressure, but have no effects on fasting glucose in normal volunteers or insulin sensitivity, as assessed by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps. Fasting insulin may be lowered by fat. Monounsaturated fat (MUFA) is preferable to polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) for fasting insulin and glucose lowering. The addition of 3–4 g of N3 fats will lower TG and blood pressure (BP) and reduce the proportion of subjects with metabolic syndrome. Dairy fat (50% saturated fat) is also related to a lower incidence of metabolic syndrome in cohort studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbohydrate; polyunsaturated fat; monounsaturated fat; saturated fat; fish oil; meta-analyses; lipids; glucose; blood pressure; insulin resistance carbohydrate; polyunsaturated fat; monounsaturated fat; saturated fat; fish oil; meta-analyses; lipids; glucose; blood pressure; insulin resistance
MDPI and ACS Style

Clifton, P. Metabolic Syndrome—Role of Dietary Fat Type and Quantity. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1438. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071438

AMA Style

Clifton P. Metabolic Syndrome—Role of Dietary Fat Type and Quantity. Nutrients. 2019; 11(7):1438. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071438

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clifton, Peter. 2019. "Metabolic Syndrome—Role of Dietary Fat Type and Quantity" Nutrients 11, no. 7: 1438. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071438

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