Next Article in Journal
Application of an Australian Dietary Guideline Index to Weighed Food Records
Next Article in Special Issue
Food Addiction Is Associated with Irrational Beliefs via Trait Anxiety and Emotional Eating
Previous Article in Journal
Mediterranean Diet Adherence is Associated with Lower Prevalence of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Previous Article in Special Issue
Ethical, Stigma, and Policy Implications of Food Addiction: A Scoping Review
Open AccessArticle

Food Addiction Symptoms and Amygdala Response in Fasted and Fed States

1
Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
3
Department of Psychiatry, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), and CIBERSAM, 08907 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1285; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061285
Received: 5 May 2019 / Revised: 4 June 2019 / Accepted: 4 June 2019 / Published: 6 June 2019
Few studies have investigated the underlying neural substrates of food addiction (FA) in humans using a recognised assessment tool. In addition, no studies have investigated subregions of the amygdala (basolateral (BLA) and central amygdala), which have been linked to reward-seeking behaviours, susceptibility to weight gain, and promoting appetitive behaviours, in the context of FA. This pilot study aimed to explore the association between FA symptoms and activation in the BLA and central amygdala via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in response to visual food cues in fasted and fed states. Females (n = 12) aged 18–35 years completed two fMRI scans (fasted and fed) while viewing high-calorie food images and low-calorie food images. Food addiction symptoms were assessed using the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Associations between FA symptoms and activation of the BLA and central amygdala were tested using bilateral masks and small-volume correction procedures in multiple regression models, controlling for BMI. Participants were 24.1 ± 2.6 years, with mean BMI of 27.4 ± 5.0 kg/m2 and FA symptom score of 4.1 ± 2.2. A significant positive association was identified between FA symptoms and higher activation of the left BLA to high-calorie versus low-calorie foods in the fasted session, but not the fed session. There were no significant associations with the central amygdala in either session. This exploratory study provides pilot data to inform future studies investigating the neural mechanisms underlying FA. View Full-Text
Keywords: Food addiction; Yale Food Addiction Scale; functional magnetic resonance imaging; basolateral amygdala Food addiction; Yale Food Addiction Scale; functional magnetic resonance imaging; basolateral amygdala
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Pursey, K.M.; Contreras-Rodriguez, O.; Collins, C.E.; Stanwell, P.; Burrows, T.L. Food Addiction Symptoms and Amygdala Response in Fasted and Fed States. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1285. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061285

AMA Style

Pursey KM, Contreras-Rodriguez O, Collins CE, Stanwell P, Burrows TL. Food Addiction Symptoms and Amygdala Response in Fasted and Fed States. Nutrients. 2019; 11(6):1285. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061285

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pursey, Kirrilly M.; Contreras-Rodriguez, Oren; Collins, Clare E.; Stanwell, Peter; Burrows, Tracy L. 2019. "Food Addiction Symptoms and Amygdala Response in Fasted and Fed States" Nutrients 11, no. 6: 1285. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061285

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop