Next Article in Journal
Mulberry Extract Attenuates Endothelial Dysfunction through the Regulation of Uncoupling Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in High Fat Diet Rats
Next Article in Special Issue
Estimating Vitamin C Status in Critically Ill Patients with a Novel Point-of-Care Oxidation-Reduction Potential Measurement
Previous Article in Journal
Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet is Associated with Better Sleep Quality in Italian Adults
Previous Article in Special Issue
Vitamin C Can Shorten the Length of Stay in the ICU: A Meta-Analysis
Open AccessReview

The Effect of Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) in the Treatment of Patients with Cancer: A Systematic Review

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, 6229 HX Maastricht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 977; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11050977
Received: 22 January 2019 / Revised: 18 April 2019 / Accepted: 24 April 2019 / Published: 28 April 2019
Many cancer patients on intensive chemotherapy lack vitamin C. Vitamin C stimulates the production and activation of immune cells, so perhaps supplementation could be used to improve the immunity in those patients. This review assesses the effectiveness and safety of vitamin C administration in cancer. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched and all study designs except for phase I studies, and case reports were included in this review. A total of 19 trials were included. In only 4 trials randomization was used to determine if patients received vitamin C or a placebo. The result of this review does not prove that there is a clinically relevant positive effect of vitamin C supplementation in cancer patients in general on the overall survival, clinical status, quality of life (QOL) and performance status (PS), since the quality of the studies published is low. Interventions and patient groups are very diverse, hence an effect in some patient groups is possible. There seems to be a better effect with intravenous than oral administration. Nevertheless, treatment with vitamin C is safe with minimal side effects. Thereby, we think it is safe to examine the effects of vitamin C on specific groups of patients in a randomized controlled setting. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin C; ascorbic acid; cancer; supplementation; overall survival; adverse events vitamin C; ascorbic acid; cancer; supplementation; overall survival; adverse events
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

van Gorkom, G.N.; Lookermans, E.L.; Van Elssen, C.H.; Bos, G.M. The Effect of Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) in the Treatment of Patients with Cancer: A Systematic Review. Nutrients 2019, 11, 977.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop