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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Tomato Nutrient Complex on Blood Pressure: A Double Blind, Randomized Dose–Response Study

1
Hypertension Unit, Soroka University Medical center and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84101, Israel
2
Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel
3
Lycored Ltd., Secaucus, NJ 07094, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: Internal medicine D, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem 9103102, Israel.
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 950; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11050950
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 11 April 2019 / Accepted: 24 April 2019 / Published: 26 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carotenoids and Human Health)
Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension, a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Tomato carotenoids such as lycopene and the colorless carotenoids phytoene and phytofluene induce the antioxidant defense mechanism. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study aimed to find effective doses of Tomato Nutrient Complex (TNC) to maintain normal blood pressure in untreated hypertensive individuals. The effect of TNC treatment (5, 15 and 30 mg lycopene) was compared with 15 mg of synthetic lycopene and a placebo over eight weeks. Results indicate that only TNC treatment standardized for 15 or 30 mg of lycopene was associated with significant reductions in mean systolic blood pressure (SBP). Treatment with the lower dose standardized for 5 mg of lycopene or treatment with 15 mg of synthetic lycopene as a standalone had no significant effect. To test carotenoid bioavailability, volunteers were treated for four weeks with TNC providing 2, 5 or 15 mg lycopene. The increase in blood levels of lycopene, phytoene, and phytofluene was dose dependent. Results suggest that only carotenoid levels achieved by the TNC dose of 15 mg lycopene or higher correlate to a beneficial effect on SBP in hypertensive subjects while lower doses and lycopene alone do not. View Full-Text
Keywords: hypertension; carotenoids; tomato extract; lycopene; phytoene; phytofluene; bioavailability hypertension; carotenoids; tomato extract; lycopene; phytoene; phytofluene; bioavailability
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Wolak, T.; Sharoni, Y.; Levy, J.; Linnewiel-Hermoni, K.; Stepensky, D.; Paran, E. Effect of Tomato Nutrient Complex on Blood Pressure: A Double Blind, Randomized Dose–Response Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 950.

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