Next Article in Journal
Isocaloric Substitution of Dietary Carbohydrate Intake with Fat Intake and MRI-Determined Total Volumes of Visceral, Subcutaneous and Hepatic Fat Content in Middle-Aged Adults
Previous Article in Journal
Comprehensive Analysis of the Real Lifestyles of T1D Patients for the Purpose of Designing a Personalized Counselor for Prandial Insulin Dosing
Open AccessArticle

Probiotic Lactobacillus casei: Effective for Managing Childhood Diarrhea by Altering Gut Microbiota and Attenuating Fecal Inflammatory Markers

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan 33303, Taiwan
2
Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan 33303, Taiwan
3
Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Clinical Informatics and Medical Statistics Research Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan 33303, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1150; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051150
Received: 26 March 2019 / Revised: 18 May 2019 / Accepted: 20 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
Background: Acute diarrhea is a major cause of childhood morbidity and an economic burden for families. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of probiotics on clinical symptoms, intestinal microbiota, and inflammatory markers during childhood diarrhea. Methods: Children (n = 81) aged six months to six years (mean age 2.31 years) hospitalized for acute diarrhea were randomized to receive probiotics (Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus; n = 42) or no probiotics (n = 39) orally twice daily for seven days. Feces samples were also collected to evaluate microbial content using a traditional agar plate and next-generation sequencing. Immunoglobulin A (IgA), lactoferrin, and calprotectin were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared in different groups. Other clinical symptoms or signs, including fever, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloated abdomen, daily intake, appetite, and body weight were also assessed. Results: Data were collected from 81 individuals across three different time points. Total fecal IgA levels in fecal extracts of the probiotics group were higher than those in the control group, reaching statistical significance (p < 0.05). Concentrations of fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin were significantly downregulated in patients with probiotic Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lc) consumption compared to those of the control (p < 0.05). Probiotic Lc administration may be beneficial for gut-microbiota modulation, as shown by the data collected at one week after enrollment. Counts of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus species were elevated in stool culture of the probiotic group. Appetite and oral intake, body-weight gain, abdominal pain, bloating, as well as bowel habits (diarrhea) were much better in children receiving probiotics compared with those in the control group. Conclusion: Fecal IgA increased during acute diarrhea under Lc treatment; in contrast, fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin were downregulated during acute diarrhea under Lc treatment. Probiotic Lc may be a useful supplement for application in children during acute diarrhea to reduce clinical severity and intestinal inflammatory reaction. View Full-Text
Keywords: probiotics; Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lc); microbiota; immunoglobulin A (IgA); lactoferrin; calprotectin probiotics; Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lc); microbiota; immunoglobulin A (IgA); lactoferrin; calprotectin
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lai, H.-H.; Chiu, C.-H.; Kong, M.-S.; Chang, C.-J.; Chen, C.-C. Probiotic Lactobacillus casei: Effective for Managing Childhood Diarrhea by Altering Gut Microbiota and Attenuating Fecal Inflammatory Markers. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1150.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop