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Open AccessArticle

Egg Consumption in U.S. Children is Associated with Greater Daily Nutrient Intakes, including Protein, Lutein + Zeaxanthin, Choline, α-Linolenic Acid, and Docosahexanoic Acid

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Nutritional Strategies, Nutrition Research & Regulatory Affairs, 59 Marriott Place, Paris, ON N3L 0A3, Canada
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Nutrition Impact, Nutrition Research, 9725 D Drive North, Battle Creek, MI 49014, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1137; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051137
Received: 25 March 2019 / Revised: 29 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 May 2019 / Published: 22 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Eating Behavior in Children)
Dietary pattern recommendations include consuming a variety of nutrient-dense foods in children and adolescents to promote optimal growth and development. The current study investigated associations with egg consumption and nutrient intakes, diet quality, and growth outcomes relative to non-egg consumers. The analysis used data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2012 in children and adolescents aged 2–18 years (N = 3,299, egg consumers; N = 17,030, egg non-consumers). Daily energy and nutrient intakes were adjusted for the complex sample design of NHANES using appropriate weights. Consuming eggs was associated with increased daily energy intake relative to non-egg consumption. Children and adolescents consuming eggs had elevated daily intake of protein, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated and total fat, α-linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), choline, lutein + zeaxanthin, vitamin D, potassium, phosphorus, and selenium. Egg consumers had greater consumption, sodium, saturated fat, with reduced total and added sugar versus egg non-consumers. The analysis also showed that egg consumption was linked with lower intake of dietary folate, iron, and niacin. No associations were determined when examining diet quality and growth-related measures. A sub-analysis considering socioeconomic status showed that egg consumption was positively related with daily lutein + zeaxanthin and DHA intake. The current analysis demonstrated several nutrient-related benefits to support the continued inclusion of eggs in the dietary patterns of children and adolescents. View Full-Text
Keywords: NHANES; children; adolescents; nutrients; eggs; diet quality; dietary patterns NHANES; children; adolescents; nutrients; eggs; diet quality; dietary patterns
MDPI and ACS Style

Papanikolaou, Y.; Fulgoni, V.L., III. Egg Consumption in U.S. Children is Associated with Greater Daily Nutrient Intakes, including Protein, Lutein + Zeaxanthin, Choline, α-Linolenic Acid, and Docosahexanoic Acid. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1137.

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