Next Article in Journal
Are Older Adults without a Healthy Diet Less Physically Active and More Sedentary?
Previous Article in Journal
Total, Added, and Free Sugar Consumption and Adherence to Guidelines in Switzerland: Results from the First National Nutrition Survey menuCH
Open AccessArticle

Dietary Walnut Supplementation Alters Mucosal Metabolite Profiles During DSS-Induced Colonic Ulceration

1
Center for Molecular Oncology, University of Connecticut Health, Farmington, CT 06030, USA
2
Integrated Metabolomics Analysis Core, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1118; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051118
Received: 12 April 2019 / Revised: 10 May 2019 / Accepted: 15 May 2019 / Published: 20 May 2019
  |  
PDF [1297 KB, uploaded 21 May 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Walnuts contain a complex array of natural compounds and phytochemicals that exhibit a wide range of health benefits, including protection against inflammation and colon cancer. In this study, we assess the effects of dietary supplementation with walnuts on colonic mucosal injury induced in mice by the ulcerogenic agent, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). C57Bl/6J mice were started on the Total Western Diet supplemented with freshly-ground whole walnuts (0, 3.5, 7 and 14% g/kg) 2 weeks prior to a 5-day DSS treatment and walnut diets were continued throughout the entire experimental period. Mice were examined at 2 days or 10 days after withdrawal of DSS. In a separate study, a discovery-based metabolite profiling analysis using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was performed on fecal samples and colonic mucosa following two weeks of walnut supplementation. Dietary walnut supplementation showed significant effects in the 10-day post-DSS recovery-phase study, in which the extent of ulceration was significantly reduced (7.5% vs. 0.3%, p < 0.05) with 14% walnuts. In the metabolite-profiling analysis, walnuts caused a significant increase in several polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and 9-oxo-10(E),12(E)-octadecadienoic acid (9-oxoODA), as well as kynurenic acid. In colon tissue samples, walnuts caused a significant increase in the levels of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and betaine, important components of fatty acid β-oxidation. These metabolite changes may contribute in part to the observed protection against DSS-induced inflammatory tissue injury. View Full-Text
Keywords: walnuts; omega-3 fatty acids; lipid metabolites; inflammation; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; ulcerative colitis walnuts; omega-3 fatty acids; lipid metabolites; inflammation; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; ulcerative colitis
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Nakanishi, M.; Matz, A.; Klemashevich, C.; Rosenberg, D.W. Dietary Walnut Supplementation Alters Mucosal Metabolite Profiles During DSS-Induced Colonic Ulceration. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1118.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top