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Open AccessArticle

Influence of Vitamin D Deficiency on Inflammatory Markers and Clinical Disease Activity in IBD Patients

1
IBD Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic la Fe, 46026 Valencia, Spain
2
IBD Research Group, Medical Research Institute Hospital la Fe (IIS La Fe), 46026 Valencia, Spain
3
Networked Biomedical Research Center for Hepatic and Digestive Diseases (CIBEREHD), Institute of Health Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain
4
Department of Clinical Analysis, Hospital Universitari i Politècnic la Fe, 46026 Valencia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1059; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051059
Received: 31 March 2019 / Revised: 6 May 2019 / Accepted: 8 May 2019 / Published: 11 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD))
Vitamin D has recently been discovered to be a potential immune modulator. Low serum vitamin D levels have been associated with risk of relapse and exacerbation of clinical outcomes in Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). A retrospective, longitudinal study was conducted to determine the association between vitamin D levels and inflammatory markers and clinical disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, circulating 25(OH)D3 progression was evaluated according to vitamin D supplementation. Participants were separated into three groups according to their vitamin D level: severe deficiency (SD), moderate deficiency (MD) and sufficiency (S). Serum 25(OH)D3 was inversely correlated with faecal calprotectin (FC) for CD and UC but was only correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) for UC patients. In the multivariate analysis of FC, CRP and fibrinogen (FBG), we predicted the presence of a patient in the SD group with 80% accuracy. A deficiency of 25(OH)D3 was associated with increased hospitalisations, flare-ups, the use of steroids and escalating treatment. Supplemental doses of vitamin D were likely to be insufficient to reach adequate serum levels of 25(OH)D3. Vitamin D intervention studies are warranted to determine whether giving higher doses of vitamin D in IBD might reduce intestinal inflammation or disease activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin D; Crohn’s disease; ulcerative colitis; faecal calprotectin; C-reactive protein vitamin D; Crohn’s disease; ulcerative colitis; faecal calprotectin; C-reactive protein
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MDPI and ACS Style

López-Muñoz, P.; Beltrán, B.; Sáez-González, E.; Alba, A.; Nos, P.; Iborra, M. Influence of Vitamin D Deficiency on Inflammatory Markers and Clinical Disease Activity in IBD Patients. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1059.

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