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Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020299

Reduced Neuroinflammation and Improved Functional Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury by Prophylactic Diet Supplementation in Mice

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
2
NutriFusion®, LLC, Naples, FL 34109, USA
3
Departments of Molecular Medicine, Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology and Pathology and Cell Biology, and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
4
James A. Haley VA Medical Center, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
5
Shriners Hospital for Children, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 December 2018 / Revised: 25 January 2019 / Accepted: 29 January 2019 / Published: 31 January 2019
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Abstract

Currently, there are no approved therapeutic drugs for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and new targets and approaches are needed to provide relief from the long-term effects of TBI. Recent studies suggest that nutrition plays a critical role in improving the outcome from TBI in both civilians and military personnel. We have previously shown that GrandFusion® (GF) diets improved recovery from cerebral ischemia and enhanced physical activity and endurance in rodent models. We, therefore, sought to determine the impact of a prophylactic diet enriched in fruits and vegetables on recovery from TBI in the controlled cortical impact rodent model. Results demonstrated that mice fed the diets had improved neuromotor function, reduced lesion volume, increased neuronal density in the hippocampus and reduced inflammation. As previously shown, TBI increases cathepsin B as part of the inflammasome complex resulting in elevated inflammatory markers like interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Consumption of the GF diets attenuated the increase in cathepsin B levels and prevented the increase in the proapoptotic factor Bax following TBI. These data suggest that prior consumption of diets enriched in fruits and vegetables either naturally or through powdered form can provide protection from the detrimental effects of TBI. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; traumatic brain injury; inflammation; mitochondrial biogenesis; behavior diet; traumatic brain injury; inflammation; mitochondrial biogenesis; behavior
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Yu, J.; Zhu, H.; Taheri, S.; Monday, W.; Perry, S.; Kindy, M.S. Reduced Neuroinflammation and Improved Functional Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury by Prophylactic Diet Supplementation in Mice. Nutrients 2019, 11, 299.

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