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Open AccessArticle

The Effect of Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract Supplementation on Weight Gain, Adiposity and Intestinal Function in Ovariectomized Mice

1
USDA ARS Soil-Plant-Nutrient Research Unit, Fort Collins, CO 80526, USA
2
Metabolomics Core Facility, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
3
Proteomics and Metabolomics Facility, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
4
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 3004; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11123004
Received: 29 October 2019 / Revised: 20 November 2019 / Accepted: 4 December 2019 / Published: 7 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Compounds Impact on Human Gut Microbiome and Gut Health)
Estrogen decline during menopause is associated with altered metabolism, weight gain and increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases. The gut microbiota also plays a role in the development of cardiometabolic dysfunction and is also subject to changes associated with age-related hormone changes. Phytoestrogens are plant-based estrogen mimics that have gained popularity as dietary supplements for the treatment or prevention of menopause-related symptoms. These compounds have the potential to both modulate and be metabolized by the gut microbiota. Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) contain potent phytoestrogen precursors, which rely on microbial biotransformation in the gut to estrogenic forms. We supplemented ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-operated (SHAM) C57BL/6 mice, with oral estradiol (E2), a flavonoid-rich extract from hops, or a placebo carrier oil, to observe effects on adiposity, inflammation, and gut bacteria composition. Hops extract (HE) and E2 protected against increased visceral adiposity and liver triglyceride accumulation in OVX animals. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of OVX having a significant impact on the overall gut bacterial community structure. We did find differences in the abundance of Akkermansia muciniphila, which was lower with HE treatment in the SHAM group relative to OVX E2 treatment and to placebo in the SHAM group. View Full-Text
Keywords: adiposity; dysbiosis; hops; menopause; microbiota; 8-prenylnaringenin; obesity; ovariectomy adiposity; dysbiosis; hops; menopause; microbiota; 8-prenylnaringenin; obesity; ovariectomy
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Hamm, A.K.; Manter, D.K.; Kirkwood, J.S.; Wolfe, L.M.; Cox-York, K.; Weir, T.L. The Effect of Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract Supplementation on Weight Gain, Adiposity and Intestinal Function in Ovariectomized Mice. Nutrients 2019, 11, 3004.

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