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An Anthocyanin-Rich Mixed-Berry Intervention May Improve Insulin Sensitivity in a Randomized Trial of Overweight and Obese Adults

1
USDA, ARS, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
2
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
3
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
4
Plants for Human Health Institute, North Carolina State University, Kannapolis, NC 28081, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2876; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122876
Received: 22 October 2019 / Revised: 15 November 2019 / Accepted: 21 November 2019 / Published: 25 November 2019
Evidence supports the beneficial effects of berries on glucoregulation, possibly related to flavonoid content, fiber content, or both. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of mixed berries to improve insulin sensitivity and to identify the potential role of flavonoids and fiber. In a randomized cross-over trial with four treatment periods, overweight/obese men and women were fed a controlled 45% fat diet for one week prior to a meal-based glucose tolerance test. The same base diet was provided during each feeding period with the addition of one of four treatments: whole mixed berries, sugar matched mixed berry juice, sugar matched gelatin, and sugar/fiber matched gelatin. Subjects then completed a meal-based oral glucose tolerance test. Serum glucose, insulin and non-esterified fatty acids were not different between individual treatments. However, in a secondary analysis, the combined berry preparations resulted in a lower serum insulin area under the curve (difference of 0.15 ± 0.066 ln pmol min/mL, mean ± SE, p = 0.0228), compared to the combined gelatin treatments, while the difference for serum glucose did not quite meet statistical significance (difference of 0.17 ± 0.093 ln mg·min/dL, mean ± SE, p = 0.0738). These results suggest the potential for mixed berry preparations to improve post-prandial insulin response. View Full-Text
Keywords: berries; insulin sensitivity; diabetes; T2DM berries; insulin sensitivity; diabetes; T2DM
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Solverson, P.M.; Henderson, T.R.; Debelo, H.; Ferruzzi, M.G.; Baer, D.J.; Novotny, J.A. An Anthocyanin-Rich Mixed-Berry Intervention May Improve Insulin Sensitivity in a Randomized Trial of Overweight and Obese Adults. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2876.

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